Fort Drum Soldier Accused Of Killing His Wife And A State Trooper

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Screenshot via CBS

A domestic dispute in Theresa, New York, reportedly turned into a double murder on July 9, when Army soldier Justin Walters allegedly shot his wife, Nichole, and a state trooper named Joel Davis.


Walters allegedly shot his wife in the driveway outside their double-wide trailer just after 8:00 p.m. “We have numerous calls hearing gun shots prior to the trooper arriving,” a police spokesman told the Watertown Daily Times.

An unnamed neighbor was also shot when she stepped outside her home, but the injury was non-life threatening, and she is expected to make a full recovery.

State police said Davis, who was married with three children, responded to the police call of shots fired at the Walters' home in the small town near the Canadian border. When Davis arrived, police say, Walters gunned him down.

Police say that Walters surrendered quietly when additional troopers arrived at the scene. He was not wearing a shirt or shoes when he was taken into custody.

In a statement to the press, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said "the entire New York family grieves" Davis’ loss.

Walters, 32, is an Army infantryman who was stationed at Fort Drum, according to police. Little is known about his service aside from his current assignment, but Walters reportedly did at least one tour in Kandahar in 2011.

Walters is now facing two murder charges and is being held without bail. A toddler in the Walters house has also been taken by local child protective services.

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