Gerber's New EDC Knife Is The Biggest Little Blade You'll Ever Use

Gear
The Gerber Kettlebell compact folding knife 
Gerber/Task & Purpose

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There are few blades more versatile and reliable than Gerber knives, from the everyday carry pocket knife to its occasional limited-edition tribute daggers. But the latest offering from the company's bladesmiths may be its most compact yet.

The brand new Kettlebell compact folding knife offers up a conventional 2.5-inch blade that's relatively commonplace in the increasingly EDC-obsessed world, forged from the 7Cr17MoV stainless steel that allows budget EDC pocket knives to perform like expensive blades — and what makes them a relative steal. But the most unique part of the Kettlebell is the 4-inch coiled aluminum handle:

Gerber

The Gerber Kettlebell compact folding knife

A bit longer than the typical EDC knife, the extended handle allows you to apply maximum power with maximum comfort without substantially adding to the knife's 4.6 oz weight. Not only does this make the knife a bit more reliable for certain jobs, but this is a big deal for guys like me with minimal coordination who normally live in constant fear of losing their grip and stabbing themselves on dainty little blades

Between the quality steel and the specially-designed handle, the Kettlebell's price tag of $27 is worth every penny.

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