7 Veteran-Friendly Manufacturers That Are Hiring

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U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Josh Cote.

Leave the “service economy” stuff to other people. You were in the military. You do things, and now that you’ve transitioned, you want to make things. Maybe you swung a wrench, or maybe you designed systems; any way you slice it, you did. Join these great companies that manufacture stuff — that make; that do.


Intel is a household name — its chips and semiconductors enable much of what we’ve come to take for granted in the digital age. The company has a long-standing commitment to hire from the military talent pool; in fact, Intel has its own team dedicated to hiring transitioning service members who have technical backgrounds — including electrical, mechanical, and maintenance experience.

See all jobs at Intel »

Baxter International Inc. provides a broad portfolio of essential medical products. Recognizing the experience and dedication veterans bring to the workplace, Baxter actively recruits military personnel transitioning to the business world. Their range of career opportunities provides a vast array of possibilities for matching veterans with the right role.

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Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute, and service engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Cummins offers veterans an integrated balance of challenging professional work experience, exposure to global projects and the opportunity to make an immediate impact.

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The Coca-Cola Company is the world’s largest beverage company, providing consumers with more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Coca-Cola has the strongest portfolio of brands in the nonalcoholic beverage industry, featuring 20 brands that each generate more than $1 billion in annual retail sales.

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Mohawk Industries, Inc. is a leading global flooring manufacturer that creates products to enhance residential and commercial spaces around the world. Transitioners and veterans of all ranks and education level who served in military specialties such as combat arms, logistics and maintenance will easily find an opening to match their skills and experience.

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FedEx Ground is a subsidiary of FedEx Corporation and one of the world’s leading providers of small-package ground delivery service. FedEx has appeared on Fortune Magazine’s list of America’s Most Admired Companies, 100 Best Companies to Work For, and World’s Most Admired Companies for many years running. The company maintains many employee advancement initiatives, offers a generous promote-within policy, and has an extensive tuition assistance program.

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Applied Materials is the global leader in materials and engineering solutions for the semiconductor, flat panel display, and solar photovoltaic industries. The company has a robust veterans recruiting program and values the technical skills and leadership traits that military members bring to the table. Most jobs require great communications skills, the commitment to safety first, and the ability to lead projects and teams.

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Hospital Corpsman, 3rd Class, Jennifer Rooney, who was immediately promoted after selection through the Meritorious Promotion Program, was pinned in a ceremony Sept. 20, 2019, by her father, Robert Rooney, and grandfather, John Rooney. (U.S. Marine Corps/Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Molina)

A U.S.S. Manchester, CL-83, hat firmly tucked on his head, John Ronney, pierced the collar of his granddaughter, Jennifer Rooney's new rank during a special pinning ceremony at Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune on Sept. 25.

By Rooney's side was his son and Jennifer's father Robert, a Navy veteran. Together, three Navy veterans brought together for military tradition.

"They are the two people who taught me everything I needed to know about the Navy," said Jennifer.

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CAMP PENDLETON — The military prosecution of a Coast Guardsman accused of murder began Wednesday with a preliminary hearing at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton.

Seaman Ethan W. Tucker, 21, was arrested August 28 after a seven-month Coast Guard investigation into the January death of Seaman Ethan Kelch, 19, who served on the same ship as Tucker— the Kodiak, Alaska-based high endurance cutter Douglas Munro.

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ANKARA (Reuters) - President Tayyip Erdogan said on Saturday Turkey would press on with its offensive into northeastern Syria and "crush the heads of terrorists" if a deal with Washington on the withdrawal of Kurdish fighters from the area were not fully implemented.

Erdogan agreed on Thursday in talks with U.S. Vice President Mike Pence a five-day pause in the offensive to allow time for the Kurdish fighters to withdraw from a "safe zone" Turkey aims to establish in northeast Syria near the Turkish border.

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President Trump stoked confusion Friday by declaring the U.S. has "secured the Oil" in the Middle East amid continued fallout from the Turkish invasion of northern Syria that he enabled by pulling American troops out of the region.

It wasn't immediately clear what the president was talking about, as there were no publicly known developments in Syria or elsewhere in the Middle East relating to oil. White House aides did not return requests for comment.

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. State Department investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of state has found no evidence of deliberate mishandling of classified information by department employees.

The investigation, the results of which were released on Friday by Republican U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley's office, centered on whether Clinton, who served as the top U.S. diplomat from 2009 to 2013, jeopardized classified information by using a private email server rather than a government one.

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