7 Veteran-Friendly Manufacturers That Are Hiring

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U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Josh Cote.

Leave the “service economy” stuff to other people. You were in the military. You do things, and now that you’ve transitioned, you want to make things. Maybe you swung a wrench, or maybe you designed systems; any way you slice it, you did. Join these great companies that manufacture stuff — that make; that do.


Intel is a household name — its chips and semiconductors enable much of what we’ve come to take for granted in the digital age. The company has a long-standing commitment to hire from the military talent pool; in fact, Intel has its own team dedicated to hiring transitioning service members who have technical backgrounds — including electrical, mechanical, and maintenance experience.

See all jobs at Intel »

Baxter International Inc. provides a broad portfolio of essential medical products. Recognizing the experience and dedication veterans bring to the workplace, Baxter actively recruits military personnel transitioning to the business world. Their range of career opportunities provides a vast array of possibilities for matching veterans with the right role.

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Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute, and service engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Cummins offers veterans an integrated balance of challenging professional work experience, exposure to global projects and the opportunity to make an immediate impact.

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The Coca-Cola Company is the world’s largest beverage company, providing consumers with more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Coca-Cola has the strongest portfolio of brands in the nonalcoholic beverage industry, featuring 20 brands that each generate more than $1 billion in annual retail sales.

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Mohawk Industries, Inc. is a leading global flooring manufacturer that creates products to enhance residential and commercial spaces around the world. Transitioners and veterans of all ranks and education level who served in military specialties such as combat arms, logistics and maintenance will easily find an opening to match their skills and experience.

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FedEx Ground is a subsidiary of FedEx Corporation and one of the world’s leading providers of small-package ground delivery service. FedEx has appeared on Fortune Magazine’s list of America’s Most Admired Companies, 100 Best Companies to Work For, and World’s Most Admired Companies for many years running. The company maintains many employee advancement initiatives, offers a generous promote-within policy, and has an extensive tuition assistance program.

See all jobs at FedEx Ground »

Applied Materials is the global leader in materials and engineering solutions for the semiconductor, flat panel display, and solar photovoltaic industries. The company has a robust veterans recruiting program and values the technical skills and leadership traits that military members bring to the table. Most jobs require great communications skills, the commitment to safety first, and the ability to lead projects and teams.

See all jobs at Applied Materials »

U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Sandra Welch

This article originally appeared on Military.com.

Inside Forward Operating Base Oqab in Kabul, Afghanistan stands a wall painted with a mural of an airman kneeling before a battlefield cross. Beneath it, a black gravestone bookended with flowers and dangling dog tags displays the names of eight U.S. airmen and an American contractor killed in a horrific insider attack at Kabul International Airport in 2011.

It's one of a number of such memorials ranging from plaques, murals and concrete T-walls scattered across Afghanistan. For the last eight years, those tributes have been proof to the families of the fallen that their loved ones have not been forgotten. But with a final U.S. pullout from Afghanistan possibly imminent, those families fear the combat-zone memorials may be lost for good.

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DOD photo

After a string of high profile incidents, the commander overseeing the Navy SEALs released an all hands memo stating that the elite Naval Special Warfare community has a discipline problem, and pinned the blame on those who place loyalty to their teammates over the Navy and the nation they serve.

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Ed Mahoney/Kickstarter

In June 2011 Iraq's defense minister announced that U.S. troops who had deployed to the country would receive the Iraq Commitment Medal in recognition of their service. Eight years later, millions of qualified veterans have yet to receive it.

The reason: The Iraqi government has so far failed to provide the medals to the Department of Defense for approval and distribution.

A small group of veterans hopes to change that.

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F-16 Fighting Falcon (Photo: US Air Force)

For a cool $8.5 million, you could be the proud owner of a "fully functioning" F-16 A/B Fighting Falcon fighter jet that a South Florida company acquired from Jordan.

The combat aircraft, which can hit a top speed of 1,357 mph at 40,000 feet, isn't showroom new — it was built in 1980. But it still has a max range of 2,400 miles and an initial climb rate of 62,000 feet per minute and remains militarized, according to The Drive, an automotive website that also covers defense topics, WBDO News 96.5 reported Wednesday.

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