7 Veteran-Friendly Manufacturers That Are Hiring

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U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Josh Cote.

Leave the “service economy” stuff to other people. You were in the military. You do things, and now that you’ve transitioned, you want to make things. Maybe you swung a wrench, or maybe you designed systems; any way you slice it, you did. Join these great companies that manufacture stuff — that make; that do.


Intel is a household name — its chips and semiconductors enable much of what we’ve come to take for granted in the digital age. The company has a long-standing commitment to hire from the military talent pool; in fact, Intel has its own team dedicated to hiring transitioning service members who have technical backgrounds — including electrical, mechanical, and maintenance experience.

See all jobs at Intel »

Baxter International Inc. provides a broad portfolio of essential medical products. Recognizing the experience and dedication veterans bring to the workplace, Baxter actively recruits military personnel transitioning to the business world. Their range of career opportunities provides a vast array of possibilities for matching veterans with the right role.

See all jobs at Baxter »

Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute, and service engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Cummins offers veterans an integrated balance of challenging professional work experience, exposure to global projects and the opportunity to make an immediate impact.

See all jobs at Cummins »

The Coca-Cola Company is the world’s largest beverage company, providing consumers with more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Coca-Cola has the strongest portfolio of brands in the nonalcoholic beverage industry, featuring 20 brands that each generate more than $1 billion in annual retail sales.

See all jobs at Coca-Cola »

Mohawk Industries, Inc. is a leading global flooring manufacturer that creates products to enhance residential and commercial spaces around the world. Transitioners and veterans of all ranks and education level who served in military specialties such as combat arms, logistics and maintenance will easily find an opening to match their skills and experience.

See all jobs at Mohawk Industries »

FedEx Ground is a subsidiary of FedEx Corporation and one of the world’s leading providers of small-package ground delivery service. FedEx has appeared on Fortune Magazine’s list of America’s Most Admired Companies, 100 Best Companies to Work For, and World’s Most Admired Companies for many years running. The company maintains many employee advancement initiatives, offers a generous promote-within policy, and has an extensive tuition assistance program.

See all jobs at FedEx Ground »

Applied Materials is the global leader in materials and engineering solutions for the semiconductor, flat panel display, and solar photovoltaic industries. The company has a robust veterans recruiting program and values the technical skills and leadership traits that military members bring to the table. Most jobs require great communications skills, the commitment to safety first, and the ability to lead projects and teams.

See all jobs at Applied Materials »

The first grenade core was accidentally discovered on Nov. 28, 2018, by Virginia Department of Historic Resources staff examining relics recovered from the Betsy, a British ship scuttled during the last major battle of the Revolutionary War. The grenade's iron jacket had dissolved, but its core of black powder remained potent. Within a month or so, more than two dozen were found. (Virginia Department of Historic Resources via The Virginian-Pilot)

In an uh-oh episode of historic proportions, hand grenades from the last major battle of the Revolutionary War recently and repeatedly scrambled bomb squads in Virginia's capital city.

Wait – they had hand grenades in the Revolutionary War? Indeed. Hollow iron balls, filled with black powder, outfitted with a fuse, then lit and thrown.

And more than two dozen have been sitting in cardboard boxes at the Department of Historic Resources, undetected for 30 years.

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Jeremy Cuellar, left, and Kemia Hassel face life in prison if convicted of murdering Army Sgt. Tyrone Hassel III in Berrien County Dec. 31, 2018. (Courtesy of Berrien County Sheriff's Dept.)

BERRIEN COUNTY, MI -- The wife of an Army sergeant killed in December admitted that she planned his killing together with another man, communicating on Snapchat in an attempt to hide their communications, according to statements she made to police.

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A Coast Guard lieutenant arrested this week planned to "murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country," according to a court filing requesting he be detained until his trial.

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(From left to right) Chris Osman, Chris McKinley, Kent Kroeker, and Talon Burton

At least four American veterans were among a group of eight men arrested by police in Haiti earlier this week for driving without license plates and possessing an arsenal of weaponry and tactical gear.

Police in Port-au-Prince arrested five Americans, two Serbians, and one Haitian man at a police checkpoint on Sunday, according to The Miami-Herald. The men told police they were on a "government mission" but did not specify for which government, according to The Herald.

They also told police that "their boss was going to call their boss," implying that someone high in Haiti's government would vouch for them and secure their release, Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles told NPR.

What they were actually doing or who they were potentially working for remains unclear. A State Department spokesperson told Task & Purpose they were aware that Haitian police arrested a "group of individuals, including some U.S. citizens," but declined to answer whether the men were employed by or operating under contract with the U.S. government.

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A photo shared by Hoda Muthana on her now-closed @ZumarulJannaTwitter account. (Twitter/ZumarulJannah)

The State Department announced Wednesday that notorious ISIS bride Hoda Muthana, a U.S.-born woman who left Alabama to join ISIS but began begging to return to the U.S. after recently deserting the terror group, is not a U.S. citizen and will not be allowed to return home.

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