Show Me Your Warface: The 3 Greatest ‘Full Metal Jacket’ Remixes Ever Made

Humor

The entire first half of Stanley Kubrick's epic Vietnam war drama Full Metal Jacket is one of the greatest depictions of Marine Corps Recruit Training in cinematic history. And though the sequence may seem a bit out-of-date today, one scene in particular has remained a fan favorite of troops and “nasty civilians” since the iconic film premiered in 1987.


The moment captures the mix of fear, frustration, and general confusion that is Marine Corps life boot camp. There’s the desperate, but completely understandable confusion that washes over the face of Pvt. Joker’s (Matthew Modine); being told to show someone your “war face” is about as odd as a stranger asking you to show them your “oh face.” The moment is followed by the immediate shock of a sudden reprimand, before Joker’s drill instructor, the terrifying Gunnery Sgt. Hartman (R. Lee Ermey), provides a brief period of instruction. It’s perfect, and some would say the scene is better left untouched. After all, you can’t improve on perfection?

Wrong. All you need is a bit of time on your hands, that right blend of belligerence and motivation, an affinity for dubstep, and a healthy dose of auto-tune.

The Oct. 18 video by the Facebook group America, Hell Yeah quickly went viral among fans, and for good reason: just listen to those beats drop in this Full Metal remix. It’s great, sure, but the video is far from the only attempt to remaster a masterpiece.

There’s Full Metal Disney by YouTuber dingdangler, which, though an oldie, is still a goodie. Arguably, it’s the dialogue in Full Metal Jacket — especially Ermey’s stone-cold drill instructor — that makes it so memorable, but if you’ve never heard Donald Duck threaten to “unscrew your head and shit down your neck!,” then you’ve missed out on life.

Related: 10 Things You Never Realized About Full Metal Jacket »

Because remixing a single scene isn’t enough for some people, the YouTube channel VoiceUnder, went ahead and rebooted two classics with Full Metal Hope — don’t worry, there’s no Ewoks.

Though not every scene lines up perfectly — it tries to get a lot of mileage out Ermey’s dialogue — the video has a few amazing moments, like when our Helmet-headed sith lord is informed that the “Death Star plans are not aboard this ship,” to which he replies: “Well, no shit.” Hopefully, J.J. Abrams will consider casting Ermey as a stormtrooper drill instructor for his final Star Wars flick.

On the topic of reboots: if you’ve got a killer Full Metal Jacket remix squirreled away somewhere, share it in the comments. It’s your duty, dammit.

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