Guam Raises Tobacco Age From 18 To 21; Military Bases Will Observe New Law

news
U.S. Army/ Staff Sgt. Jason Epperson

Commissaries and exchange stores on Guam have been ordered to stop selling tobacco products — including electronic cigarettes — to personnel under age 21 because of a new law that took effect Monday on the U.S. island territory.


The order, which was relayed Tuesday in a message from Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer, says the restriction applies to all Joint Region Marianas facilities, including Andersen Air Force Base and Naval Base Guam. Before the new year, the minimum age for purchasing tobacco on the island was 18.

Spencer also directed under-21 servicemembers, dependents and civilian workers to refrain from possessing, distributing and using tobacco products on shore-based installations.

“Although state laws generally do not regulate federal activities, as a matter of policy, all military and civilian personnel, dependents, family members, residents, and guests on Joint Region Marianas installations and facilities … shall comply with the revised age limitations associated with the purchase, possession, use, and distribution prohibitions of Guam’s new tobacco law,” he wrote in the message.

Temporary workers and servicemembers passing through must also abide by the restriction; however, it does not apply to Navy vessels and areas that are exclusively under federal control.

Anyone who does not follow the territory’s new regulation or who tries to purchase tobacco products using fake identification off-base will be subject to civil penalties, according to the new law, which was cited in the Navy message. Fines range from $1,000 to $10,000 for those caught selling or distributing tobacco products to someone younger than 21.

The Navy message said Joint Region Marianas, its installations and tenant commands will promote compliance of the new law.

“Attention should be given to educating transient and temporarily assigned personnel, including visiting aircraft and ship crews,” it said.

———

©2018 the Stars and Stripes. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Casperassets.rbl.ms

Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

Take $75 off a Casper Mattress and $150 off a Wave Mattress with code TASKANDPURPOSE

And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

Read More Show Less
A Chinese tank rolls at the training ground "Tsugol", about 250 kilometers (156 miles ) south-east of the city of Chita during the military exercises Vostok 2018 in Eastern Siberia, Russia, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018 (Associated Press/Sergei Grits)

China is developing a lot of new and advanced weaponry, but a recent state media report suggests the Chinese military may not be entirely sure what to do with these new combat systems.

Read More Show Less
(The 621st Contingency Response Wing/Flickr)

The commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard called the ongoing partial government shutdown "unacceptable" following reports that some Coast Guardsmen are relying on donations from food pantries while their regular paychecks remain on hold.

"We're five-plus weeks into the anxiety and stress of this government lapse and your non-pay," Adm. Karl Schultz said in a video message to service members. "You, as members of the armed forces, should not be expected to shoulder this burden."

Read More Show Less

The U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs will implement changes next month that will simplify the process for how veterans make appeals.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The bigger and faster electromagnetic weapons elevator on the new aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford is finally ready for use, an achievement the Navy called a "major milestone" for the program and other Ford-class carriers to be built in the future.

Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer said earlier this month that he had bet his job on getting all the Ford's elevators to work, telling President Donald Trump that the project would be done by this summer "or you can fire me."

Read More Show Less