This Is What Happens When You Ask A Combat Veteran ‘How To Survive Basic’

Humor
U.S. Army photo by Nathan Snook

For those looking to enlist in the military, the lead up to basic training can be daunting. Prospective soldiers, airmen, sailors, and Marines sometimes turn to the internet for tips on how to make it through their first few months. There’s no shortage of articles and advice on how to “survive” basic training, but here’s the thing, initial training in the military really isn’t hard. In fact, it’s probably the easiest time you’ll have in your entire enlistment because everything is spelled out for you.


Yet the requests for firsthand knowledge and tips continue, and one veteran decided to respond the best way possible, by being sarcastic and belligerent as fuck.

Related: This Is What Happens When Privates Roll Sleeves For The First Time »

In a new video by “A Combat Veteran,” a military-themed comedy channel on YouTube, the show’s host, Drew Hernandez, offers some advice to would-be soldiers who want to know how survive Army basic training.

“First I want to get to the one’s that don’t want to be there: Kiss your drill sergeant. He might yell, he might knifehand, but he’ll never bitchslap,” says Hernandez, a former soldier and Iraq War veteran. “Now if you see an officer, make sure to give him the greeting of the day along with a salute. Now I get it, you probably don’t know how to salute, but it’s easy. Take your right hand, put it across your heart and extend it out to about eye level. You’re welcome.”

The most recent video — titled “A Guide To Surviving Basic Training 2!” — is a follow up to an earlier post with the same name. In the second installment, Hernandez walks viewers through how to be a good battle buddy when stuck on firewatch, what to do if you see a drill sergeant’s cover lying around, and why you should make sure to chat up every noncommissioned officer you pass, after all, you should get to know who you’re greeting.

In short, it’s funny as fuck. Watch a “Guide To Surviving Basic Training 2!” below, and see for yourself.

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