Far Cry 5's Vietnam Expansion Is ‘Rambo’ Meets ‘Tropic Thunder’

Entertainment
I love the smell of Far Cry 5 in the morning.
Ubisoft

After weeks of losing myself in the rolling hills and country roads of Far Cry 5s fictional Hope Country, Montana, strewn with the bodies of cultists who dared to stand against my all powerful shovel launcher, I’ve moved on…


...to the 'Nam.

Earlier this month, Ubisoft dropped its first downloadable expansion for Far Cry 5, titled Hours of Darkness, and I dropped, too — right off the fucking grid. Hours of Darkness is less of an add-on than a game unto itself — though it does also provide users a few new weapons for the vanilla campaign, including the oft-cursed but ever-popular M16 and the revered M60.

The expansion, $30 with the season pass, puts you in the boots of a U.S. soldier whose helo is downed by incoming fire in Vietnam. You’re lost, unarmed, and separated from your unit in a jungle crawling with enemy soldiers. The only way out is to rescue your missing squadmates and make it to the LZ ricky-tick.

Related: ‘Far Cry 5’ Taught Me To Stop Worrying And Love The Apocalypse »

Aside from a new setting, Hours of Darkness introduces a different style of play — it’s all about stealth. The perk trees are gone; ditto with the consumable item wheel. Instead, you can call in recon planes, air strikes, and accrue a new set of skills as you chain stealth kills. Various new skills let you automatically mark enemy targets and give you superhuman x-ray powers when using binos, but they vanish once you’re spotted by the enemy. And that can lead to comical moments, welcome respites from the somber tone of the campaign.

You’re sneaking through the jungle when you spot a pair of enemy soldiers by a fire. You creep up, bamboo stick in hand, throwing knife at the ready. It’s just you and your wits against enemy AKs. You prepare to toss a rock to distract them, then move in for the kill, nice and quiet like. But oh shit, you accidentally hit the wrong button and you just tossed a grenade at the wall. It explodes, knocks your ass sideways. They see you, and all those stealth perks expire, and now you’re dead.

That, or some giant jungle cat comes out of nowhere and mauls your face off.

Moments like that, when frantic button smashing derails your whole one-man-army shtick  — and there are many — can make the DLC feel more like Tropic Thunder than Rambo. And after a week of binge-playing, I’m totally fine with that.

This is me right now:

WATCH NEXT:

U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Brian Kimball

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Calling aviation geeks in New York City: The British are coming.

In their first visit to the United States since 2008, the Royal Air Force "Red Arrows" will perform an aerial demonstration next week over the Hudson River, according to an Air Force news release. F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, the Air Force Thunderbirds and Navy Blue Angels demonstration teams will also be part of the show.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Air National Guard/Staff Sgt. Michelle Y. Alvarez-Rea

Frances and Efrain Santiago, natives of Puerto Rico, wanted to show their support last month for protesters back home seeking to oust the island's governor.

The couple flew the flag of Puerto Rico on the garage of their Kissimmee home. It ticked off the homeowners association.

Someone from the Rolling Hills Estates Homeowners Association left a letter at their home, citing a "flag violation" and warning: "Please rectify the listed violation or you may incur a fine."

Frances Santiago, 38, an Army veteran, demanded to know why.

Read More Show Less
Todd Rosenberg/AP

A West Point graduate received a waiver from the U.S. Army to sign with the Philadelphia Eagles on Friday, and play in the NFL while serving as an active-duty soldier.

The waiver for 2nd Lt. Brett Toth was first reported by ESPN's Adam Schefter, who said that Toth signed a three-year deal with the Eagles. Toth graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 2018.

Read More Show Less
Indiana National Guard

The Indiana National Guard soldier who was killed on Thursday in a training accident at Fort Hood has been identified as 29-year-old Staff Sgt. Andrew Michael St. John, of Greenwood, Indiana.

Read More Show Less

QUETTA, Pakistan/KABUL (Reuters) - The brother of the leader of the Afghan Taliban was among at least four people killed in a bomb blast at a mosque in Pakistan on Friday, two Taliban sources told Reuters, an attack that could affect efforts to end the Afghan war.

Read More Show Less