Was Hitler Stoned Throughout World War II?

History
Photo via Wikimedia Commons, overlay by Matt Battaglia

In life, Adolf Hitler was many things: a failed painter, decorated soldier, Germany’s “last hope,” and eventual mass murderer of more than six million Jews. But, according to one author, he was also a “gibbering super junkie.”


It turns out that throughout World War II, Hitler was a drug addict, according to award-winning German writer Norman Ohler, author of “Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany,” due to be released on Oct. 6.

Hitler was known to be a hypochondriac, but Ohler’s book also says he was heavily into a heroin-like substance called Eukodol.

And he suggested that the decision to invade Russia in 1941 was a direct result of his addiction. The move caused many to consider Hitler “virtually insane for taking such a risk,” according to the Huffington Post. His erratic military tactics and poor decisions in the Battle of the Bulge only added to those perceptions of insanity.

Ohler told the BBC Radio 4 that Hitler “had turned to steroids and hormone products like liver extracts of pigs, stuff like that, pretty unsavoury things got into his veins.”

The book claims that throughout the entire last year of World War II, Hitler was essentially high out of his mind on upwards of 70 different drugs, including crystal meth, bull semen, and other opiates.

Ohler suggests that the deterioration of Hitler as a leader in 1944 is a direct result of his prolonged drug abuse.

His struggle came to a head during the Battle of Berlin in April 1945, when Hitler ordered raids to find whatever drugs they might be able to salvage from the pharmacies in the war-torn town center. But when that effort failed and his supply dwindled, Hitler committed suicide.

The Independent reported that the book, which contains journal excerpts from Hitler’s physician Dr. Theo Morell, says that his body was “ravaged” by drug abuse.

At one point, Hitler is cited as saying, “I cancelled injections today, to give the previous puncture holes a chance to heal. Left inside elbow good, right still has red dots (but not pustules), where injections were given.”

During that BBC Radio 4 interview, well-known World War II historian Anthony Beever applauded Ohler’s book, adding, “All of these elements show how [Hitler] was really no longer in control of himself, but he was still in control of the German armies.”

U.S. Army Paratroopers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, board an Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during a deployment readiness exercise at Green Ramp on Pope Army Airfield, North Carolina, April 27, 2019. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Chantel Green)

Paratroopers from Fort Bragg's 82nd Airborne Division will be protecting the U.S. Embassy in Iraq, officials said.

Read More

Roughly a dozen U.S. troops showing concussion-related symptoms are being medically evacuated from Al-Asad Air Base in Iraq to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, a defense official told Task & Purpose on Tuesday.

Read More

In a Galaxy — err, I mean, on a military base far, far away, soldiers are standing in solidarity with galactic freedom fighters.

Sitting at the top of an Army press release from March 2019, regarding the East Africa Response Force's deployment to Gabon, the photo seems, at first glance, just like any other: Soldiers on the move.

But if you look closer at the top right, you'll find something spectacular: A Rebel Alliance flag.

Read More
The maiden flight of the first CMV-22B Osprey took place in Amarillo, Texas (Courtesy photo)

The first of the CMV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft the Navy plans on adopting as its carrier onboard delivery (COD) aircraft of choice has successfully completed its first flight operations, manufacturer Boeing announced on Tuesday.

Read More
A soldier plugs his ears during a live fire mission at Yakima Training Center. Photo: Capt. Leslie Reed/U.S. Army

Another 300 lawsuits against 3M flooded federal courts this month as more military veterans accuse the behemoth manufacturer of knowingly making defective earplugs that caused vets to lose hearing during combat in Iraq or Afghanistan or while training on U.S. military bases.

On another front, 3M also is fighting lawsuits related to a class of chemicals known as PFAS, with the state of Michigan filing a lawsuit last week against the Maplewood-based company.

To date, nearly 2,000 U.S. veterans from Minnesota to California and Texas have filed more than 1,000 lawsuits.

Read More