Hawaii Soldier Charged With Aiding ISIS Planned To Attack Barracks As Suicide Bomber

news
A 2001 high school photo of Army Sgt. Ikaika Erik Kang. Now 34, Kang was arrested and charged with providing material aid to ISIS on July 8.
Screenshot KGMB-TV

Wheeler Army Airfield soldier and accused ISIS sympathizer Ikaika Erik Kang told a confidential source that he was going to leave the military after getting promoted, join ISIS and attack Schofield Barracks as a suicide bomber, according to documents unsealed Monday in U.S. District Court.


Kang, 35, is charged with four counts of attempting to provide material support or resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization. His trial is scheduled for next month. Kang remains in custody at the Federal Detention Center with no opportunity for release on bail or bond.

The charges accuse Kang of trying to provide IS with a training video of fighting techniques, classified U.S. military documents and military gear, including tactical equipment and ammunition. Kang is also accused of trying to provide ISIS a GoPro Karma, a consumer camera-equipped drone.

Kang is not charged with actually providing support or resources to ISIS because the people to whom he allegedly gave the video, documents and gear were undercover agents, not ISIS members or fellow ISIS sympathizers.

It is not clear from the unsealed documents when Kang allegedly told the confidential source that he planned to leave the Army and become a suicide bomber. However, the documents say Kang made other statements to the confidential source in September 2016.

The FBI referred to Kang in the documents as an Army staff sergeant and that he talked about getting promoted to sergeant first class. At the time of his arrest in July, Kang’s rank was sergeant first class.

The documents are included in the government’s application for authorization to install and monitor a tracking device on Kang’s car.

The FBI says in the application that it and military law enforcement authorities were conducting coordinated on- and off-base surveillance of Kang. The FBI said it needed the tracking device to continually monitor Kang’s movements as he entered and exited military installations without tipping him off that he was being watched.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Kenneth J. Mansfield approved the first application Oct. 7, 2016. The authorization expired Dec. 1, 2016. The government applied for and was granted five more 45-day authorizations to install, repair, replace and remove a tracking device from Kang’s personal vehicle. The last authorization expired July 13.

FBI agents arrested Kang on July 8, the day they said he swore a pledge of loyalty to a known ISIS leader, accepted an ISIS flag as a gift and said he wanted to kill people.

Documents that FBI and Naval Criminal Investigative Service special agents submitted in support of the vehicle tracking warrant applications say Kang told a confidential source that his plan was to stay in the military long enough to get promoted to sergeant first class, separate from the military, move to the Middle East, join ISIS, become a Muslim, study Arabic and follow the Quran. He also allegedly told the source that if he became a member of ISIS, he would be a suicide bomber and attack Schofield.

Kang’s court-appointed lawyer, Birney Bervar, said Monday he had not yet seen the documents and could not comment on them.

———

©2018 The Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

"It's kind of like the equivalent of dropping a soda can into canyon and putting on a blindfold and going and finding it, because you can't just look down and see it," diver Jeff Goodreau said of finding the wreck.

The USS Eagle 56 was only five miles off the coast of Maine when it exploded.

The World War I-era patrol boat split in half, then slipped beneath the surface of the North Atlantic. The Eagle 56 had been carrying a crew of 62. Rescuers pulled 13 survivors from the water that day. It was April 23, 1945, just two weeks before the surrender of Nazi Germany.

The U.S. Navy classified the disaster as an accident, attributing the sinking to a blast in the boiler room. In 2001, that ruling was changed to reflect the sinking as a deliberate act of war, perpetuated by German submarine U-853, a u-boat belonging to Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine.

Still, despite the Navy's effort to clarify the circumstances surrounding the sinking, the Eagle 56 lingered as a mystery. The ship had sunk relatively close to shore, but efforts to locate the wreck were futile for decades. No one could find the Eagle 56, a small patrol ship that had come so close to making it back home.

Then, a group of friends and amateur divers decided to try to find the wreck in 2014. After years of fruitless dives and intensive research, New England-based Nomad Exploration Team successfully located the Eagle 56 in June 2018.

Business Insider spoke to two crew members — meat truck driver Jeff Goodreau and Massachusetts Department of Corrections officer Donald Ferrara — about their discovery.

Read More Show Less
(CIA photo)

Before the 5th Special Forces Group's Operational Detachment Alpha 595, before 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment's MH-47E Chinooks, and before the Air Force combat controllers, there were a handful of CIA officers and a buttload of cash.

Read More Show Less

The last time the world saw Marine veteran Austin Tice, he had been taken prisoner by armed men. It was unclear whether his captors were jihadists or allies of Syrian dictator Bashar al Assad who were disguised as Islamic radicals.

Blindfolded and nearly out of breath, Tice spoke in Arabic before breaking into English:"Oh Jesus. Oh Jesus."

That was from a video posted on YouTube on Sept. 26, 2012, several weeks after Tice went missing near Damascus, Syria, while working as a freelance journalist for McClatchy and the Washington Post.

Now that Tice has been held in captivity for more than seven years, reporters who have regular access to President Donald Trump need to start asking him how he is going to bring Tice home.

Read More Show Less

"Shoots like a carbine, holsters like a pistol." That's the pitch behind the new Flux Defense system designed to transform the Army's brand new sidearm into a personal defense weapon.

Read More Show Less

Sometimes a joke just doesn't work.

For example, the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service tweeted and subsequently deleted a Gilbert Gottfried-esque misfire about the "Storm Area 51" movement.

On Friday DVIDSHUB tweeted a picture of a B-2 bomber on the flight line with a formation of airmen in front of it along with the caption: "The last thing #Millenials will see if they attempt the #area51raid today."

Read More Show Less