Dunford's Top Enlisted Advisor Suspended Pending Investigation Into 'Alleged Misconduct'

Code Red News
DoD photo

The senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs has been suspended from his post due to an Army Inspector General investigation into "alleged misconduct."


Army Command Sgt. Maj. John W. Troxell has been temporarily reassigned from his post as the right-hand man to Gen. Joseph Dunford to taking the role of special assistant to the Vice Director of the Joint Staff pending the outcome of the investigation, according to a Pentagon media release. The release did not offer any detail of what the allegations were.

"Due to the ongoing Army investigation, it would be inappropriate to comment on the nature of the alleged misconduct or investigation details," Col. Patrick Ryder, a Joint Staff spokesperson, said in a statement. "We will wait for a full accounting of the facts and will not presuppose any findings or outcomes."

If you have more information on this complaint, you can contact me securely via ProtonMail: paulszoldra@protonmail.com

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