The 4 Largest Tanks Ever Built (And One That Remains A Twisted Dream)

Gear
We're gonna need a bigger tank ...
Photo via RealLifeLore/YouTube

Of all the harrowing, intimidating arms and artillery dreamed up by military engineers over the last few centuries, few induce the instinctive evacuation of enemy bowels like the sight of a heavily-armed battle tank rolling up on a fortified position and crushing everything in its path. There’s a reason the M1 Abrams and its various iterations have remained a staple of the U.S. military’s front-line deployments: They’re big, they’re effective, and they scream “game over, man, game over!” the minute they rise over the horizon.


But the Abrams isn’t the only massive main battle tank to grace the imaginations of military designers, and the folks at RealLifeLore (in collaboration with Real Engineering) were kind enough to slap together a brief video rundown of the largest, most ridiculously oversized tanks in the history of modern warfare.

As Popular Mechanics points out, most of this video’s featured death wagons actually saw pants-shitting combat on real-life battlefields — the Abrams, the Char 2c, K-Wagen, and the Panzer VIII Maus. But boy, what I would give to roll downrange in a Landkreuzer P.1000 Ratte, the most aggressively ridiculous thing I’ve ever seen.

Personally approved by Hitler himself, this enormous metal juggernaut would have been as long as a regulation-sized basketball court, weighed 1,000 metric tons — 16 times more than the modern Abrams — and rocked 300 tons of munitions originally intended for naval cannons. Here’s a clip from a National Geographic documentary to give you a sense of scale:

Sadly, a Ratte prototype never saw production, but that’s probably a good thing in the end: If any tank’s going to take responsibility for epic trouser-soilings throughout the history of war, it should be the Abrams.

T-38 Talon training aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Two airmen from Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma, were killed on Thursday when two T-38 Talon training aircraft crashed during training mission, according to a message posted on the base's Facebook age.

The two airmen's names are being withheld pending next of kin notification.

A total of four airmen were onboard the aircraft at the time of the incident, base officials had previously announced.

The medical conditions for the other two people involved in the crash was not immediately known.

An investigation will be launched to determine the cause of the crash.

Emergency responders from Vance Air Force Base are at the crash scene to treat casualties and help with recovery efforts.

Read the entire message below:

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. – Two Vance Air Force Base Airmen were killed in an aircraft mishap at approximately 9:10 a.m. today.

At the time of the accident, the aircraft were performing a training mission.

Vance emergency response personnel are on scene to treat casualties and assist in recovery efforts.

Names of the deceased will be withheld pending next of kin notification.

A safety investigation team will investigate the incident.

Additional details will be provided as information becomes available. #VanceUpdates.

This is a breaking news story. It will be updated as more information is released.

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