This Is The Last Travel Bag You’ll Ever Need To Buy

Gear
Photo courtesy of Triple Aught Design

Traveling is cool, but most travel gear really isn’t. Cramming your stuff into a cheap suitcase inevitably leads to disaster when that thing bursts open at the airport or on the plane. Rolling luggage is stymied by curbs and stairs; having to hand carry your supposedly wheeled bag quickly loses its luster. Luckily Triple Aught Design, a longstanding name in outdoor apparel and nylon gear, has released the Meridian Transport Case in order to ease your travel woes. The Meridian is expensive at $425, but it may be the last travel bag you’ll ever buy.


Probably the most immediate thought when looking at the Meridian is how unassuming the bag looks. There’s no exterior PALS webbing or overly large velcro fields. There’s not even a company logo on the outside. It only comes in black. The only thing that might out the Meridian as more than just a black bag with a shoulder strap are the AustriAlpin Cobra buckles that connect said strap to the bag; those familiar with tactical gear will recognizes the Cobra buckles from gun belts and other load-bearing gear.

Photo courtesy of Triple Aught Design

But the innocuous exterior belies the rugged construction Triple Aught Design is known for. The VX-21 ripstop shell consists of lightweight 200 denier nylon that’s treated with a waterproof coating, ensuring that your stuff stays dry. The carrying strap consists of neoprene and elastic webbing that’s comfortable to shoulder even with a lot of weight in the bag. The Meridian features a clamshell design, with two outer compartments and one main one that opens wide when unzipped. The outer section offers around 477.50 cubic inches of space, while the center compartment features 1365 cubic inches. Thirty-eight liters of volume is comparable to some military and hiking packs, giving the Meridian a truly impressive carrying capacity. The lightweight and flexible constructions means the bag compress nicely, and that you’ll be able to stuff the Meridian into an airline overhead bin.   

Related: This Versatile Bag Will Hide A Handgun And So Much More »

On either side of the bag are a slip pocket and a dual zippered, pass-through pocket. One of the pass-through pockets features a hidden “admin” compartment, perfect for carrying a passport, travel documents, or other vital personal items close to the body. This is a smart feature, ideal for those traveling abroad or skittish about losing a passport.

Photo courtesy of Triple Aught Design

All these elements would make for a solid travel-oriented bag. But where the Meridian goes beyond can be found inside the bag’s three storage sections. In each are several Helix anchor points constructed of durable Hypalon synthetic rubber. Using Duraflex “siamese slik” clips, these Helix anchors can mount a varied line of packing cubes, pouches, and panels offered by Triple Aught Design. More than just a suitcase, the Meridian can fill all sorts of roles. The standard transport cubes work great for keeping clothes folded and organized, or for managing spare kit that often is strewn about in a loadout bag.The padded protector case is ideal for professional with expensive gear to keep safe, like cameras, weapon optics, or night vision. Panels of PALS webbing and velcro are ideal for a range bag setup, giving plenty of space for magazine pouches, loose ammo containers, maintenance tools, and first aid. In a pinch, you could even fit a short-barreled AR-15 in the center compartment if you separate the upper and lower receivers. The standard Duraflex clips make it simple to modify other tactical nylon to mount inside the Meridian if Triple Aught Design doesn’t offer what you’re looking for.

The modular capabilities of the Meridian Transport Case ensure it can be configured to suit most anyone’s needs. The discreet styling ensures that the bag doesn’t scream “tactical” or “expensive stuff here.” The durable construction comes at a high price that may be overkill for some, but the Meridian is the final word for hardcore road warriors, traveling gunfighters, and those racking up the frequent flyer miles.

In this June 16, 2018 photo, Taliban fighters greet residents in the Surkhroad district of Nangarhar province, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

KABUL/WASHINGTON/PESHAWAR, Pakistan (Reuters) - The United States and the Taliban will sign an agreement on Feb. 29 at the end of a week long period of violence reduction in Afghanistan, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and the Taliban said on Friday.

Read More
A developmental, early variant of the Common Unmanned Surface Vehicle (CUSV) autonomously conducts maneuvers on the Elizabeth River during its demonstration during Citadel Shield-Solid Curtain 2020 at Naval Station Norfolk on Feb. 12, 2020. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Rebekah M. Rinckey)

Large cargo ships, small fishing boats and other watercraft sail safely past Naval Station Norfolk every day, but there's always a possibility that terrorists could use any one of them to attack the world's largest naval base.

While Navy security keeps a close eye on every vessel that passes, there's an inherent risk for the sailors aboard small patrol boats who are tasked with helping keep aircraft carriers, submarines and destroyers on base safe from waterborne attacks.

So the Navy experimented Wednesday to test whether an unmanned vessel could stop a small boat threatening the base from the Elizabeth River.

Read More
U.S. soldiers inspect the site where an Iranian missile hit at Ain al-Asad air base in Anbar province, Iraq January 13, 2020. (REUTERS/John Davison)

In the wee hours of Jan. 8, Tehran retaliated over the U.S. killing of Iran's most powerful general by bombarding the al-Asad air base in Iraq.

Among the 2,000 troops stationed there was U.S. Army Specialist Kimo Keltz, who recalls hearing a missile whistling through the sky as he lay on the deck of a guard tower. The explosion lifted his body - in full armor - an inch or two off the floor.

Keltz says he thought he had escaped with little more than a mild headache. Initial assessments around the base found no serious injuries or deaths from the attack. U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted, "All is well!"

The next day was different.

"My head kinda felt like I got hit with a truck," Keltz told Reuters in an interview from al-Asad air base in Iraq's western Anbar desert. "My stomach was grinding."

Read More
A U.S. military vehicle runs a Russian armored truck off the road in Syria near the Turkish border town of Qamishli (Video screencap)

A video has emerged showing a U.S. military vehicle running a Russian armored truck off the road in Syria after it tried to pass an American convoy.

Questions still remain about the incident, to include when it occurred, though it appears to have taken place on a stretch of road near the Turkish border town of Qamishli, according to The War Zone.

Read More
(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

We are women veterans who have served in the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps. Our service – as aviators, ship drivers, intelligence analysts, engineers, professors, and diplomats — spans decades. We have served in times of peace and war, separated from our families and loved ones. We are proud of our accomplishments, particularly as many were earned while immersed in a military culture that often ignores and demeans women's contributions. We are veterans.

Yet we recognize that as we grew as leaders over time, we often failed to challenge or even question this culture. It took decades for us to recognize that our individual successes came despite this culture and the damage it caused us and the women who follow in our footsteps. The easier course has always been to tolerate insulting, discriminatory, and harmful behavior toward women veterans and service members and to cling to the idea that 'a few bad apples' do not reflect the attitudes of the whole.

Recent allegations that Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie allegedly sought to intentionally discredit a female veteran who reported a sexual assault at a VA medical center allow no such pretense.

Read More