Sgt. Danielle Farber, a medical instructor at the 166th Regiment Regional Training Institute at Fort Indiantown Gap, displays her Ranger tab. (U.S. Army/Brad Rhen)

When asked what Army Ranger School was like, Sgt. Danielle Farber wasn't going to beat around the bush: "It sucks."

Read More

Army Brig. Gen. Patrick Donahoe isn't like other generals. At least not in the way you'd think.

Read More

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Fifty years ago this month, a small Pentagon project designed to allow scientists to share time on the early versions of computers changed the world. The first links of what originally called "ARPANET" moved us all into the Internet Age, changing everything from business, dating, to daily reads.

Along the way, though, the Internet also became a new kind of battlefield. Nations, organizations, and even individuals are now hacking not just the networks themselves (a.k.a. "cyberwar," where the object is to breach a network), but also increasingly the people on them (what can be thought of as "likewar," where the object is to drive something viral through a mix of likes, shares, and sometimes lies).

Read More

When senior military leaders aren't yelling out their office windows for soldiers to stop walking on the grass, they should probably be checking out what they're talking about on social media platforms, according to the top Army general in charge of forces in South Korea.

In a post for On The Green Notebook, a military blog focused on leadership development, Gen. Robert B. Abrams writes that "being engaged on social media is becoming more of an imperative by the day," before listing 10 reasons why others need to get on board.

Read More
(U.S. Army/Capt. Adan Cazarez)

In early 2001, Ryan McCarthy was on his way out of the Army.

The Army Ranger had been in the infantry since September 1997 and his service obligation had ended. He had the option to get out, and was planning on taking it.

But that, along with everything else, changed on September 11th. His unit was called to Afghanistan, and he decided to stay. Though his former battle buddy Dan Ferris, a retired Army lieutenant colonel who served alongside him in the 75th Ranger Regiment, said it wasn't even a question.

"Ryan was like, 'There's no way in heck that I'm leaving. I'm staying and I'm going with you guys.' He was just completely dedicated to getting out there and defending our country with all of us," Ferris told Task & Purpose.

McCarthy was among the first boots on the ground during the invasion of Afghanistan. After graduating from the Virginia Military Institute, McCarthy went on to serve for five years, deploying to Afghanistan from October 2001-February 2002, and earning three Army Achievement Medals, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Combat Infantryman Badge, Ranger Tab, and Parachutist Badge, among others.

On Monday, the 45-year-old Army Under Secretary was nominated by President Donald Trump to be the top civilian in charge of the U.S. Army, replacing Mark Esper as Army Secretary, who was confirmed as Secretary of Defense in July.

Read More
U.S. Army

Members of the same family serving together isn't exactly a new concept — for many Americans, the U.S. military is a family business.

But not every family has two generals — and even rarer are those generals sisters.

Read More