This Is What It’s Like To Eat A 75-Year-Old Field Ration From World War II

Community

Here’s something that may sound odd or disgusting to anyone who’s ever served in the military: Field ration connoisseurship is a real thing. In fact, there’s a whole subculture around collecting meals ready to eat. Like, really — people pay good money for old MREs and then they eat them...because they want to.    


The man in the video posted below, who goes by the YouTube handle Steve1989, is something of a celebrity in the MRE world. Steve is like Anthony Bourdain, except that, instead of traveling the world sampling exotic cuisines and meeting interesting people, he hangs out in his bedroom and eats dehydrated food. He has fans, lots of them. Many of his videos go viral.    

Steve doesn’t smoke stale government-issued cigarettes and stuff his face with decades-old crackers and sardines to shock people. He genuinely enjoys MREs. The older and more obscure, the better. In this episode — which is one of 105 videos he’s posted to YouTube  — Steve treats himself to a World War II U.S. Army Field Ration C B Unit, and gives us, the viewer, a little history lesson along the way.

“The C-ration’s original objective was to provide the soldier with a readily carried ration, which he could use in combat, independent of outside sources of supply and central preparation facilities,” Steve explains.  

The real fun begins when Steve finally cracks open the ration. “Wow, check that out,” he says as we get our first glimpse at what’s inside the tin can. “What a time capsule. It smells kind of fruity and wholesome.” Then, unable to restrain himself any longer, Steve digs in, beginning with a piece of a 75-year-old biscuit. “Mm, that is so crisp,” he says. Adding, “This oldie is making me shake already.” 

Steve discovers what appears to be mold as he prepares his meal, but that doesn’t stop him. He eats the entire ration, and savors every morsel.

His final assessment: “Absolutely amazing.”

If Steve has somehow managed to make MREs seem appetizing to you, check out his website, MREinfo.com. There you can get all of the information you need to find and purchase MREs, which apparently average $45-$60 a case. Worth it? That depends on how much you enjoy being really, really constipated.

Screen grab via YouTube
(Courtesy of Jackie Melendrez)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Iron Mountain. Committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace, Iron Mountain is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more here.

Jackie Melendrez couldn't be prouder of her husband, her sons, and the fact that she works for the trucking company Iron Mountain. This regional router has been a Mountaineer since 2017, and says the support she receives as a military spouse and mother is unparalleled.

Read More Show Less
Photo: U.S. Army

Master Sgt. Larry Hawks, a retired engineer sergeant who served with 3rd Special Forces Group, is being awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on Friday for "valorous actions" in Afghanistan in 2005.

Read More Show Less

The Iranians just blasted one of the US military's most sophisticated and expensive drones out of the sky as tensions in the Strait of Hormuz reach the boiling point.

Read More Show Less
(Reuters/Lawrence Hurley)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A 40-foot-tall (12 meters) cross-shaped war memorial standing on public land in Maryland does not constitute government endorsement of religion, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday in a decision that leaves unanswered questions about the boundaries of the U.S. Constitution's separation of church and state.

The justices were divided on many of the legal issues but the vote was 7-2 to overturn a lower court ruling that had declared the so-called Peace Cross in Bladensburg unconstitutional in a legal challenge mounted by the American Humanist Association, a group that advocates for secular governance. The concrete cross was erected in 1925 as a memorial to troops killed in World War One.

The ruling made it clear that a long-standing monument in the shape of a Christian cross on public land was permissible but the justices were divided over whether other types of religious displays and symbols on government property would be allowed. Those issues are likely to come before the court in future cases.

Read More Show Less
(Associated Press/Facebook)

A relative of the man who opened fire outside downtown Dallas' federal building this week warned the FBI in 2016 that he shouldn't be allowed to buy a gun because he was depressed and suicidal, his mother said Thursday.

Brian Clyde's half-brother called the FBI about his concerns, their mother Nubia Brede Solis said. Clyde was in the Army at the time.

On Monday, Clyde opened fire with an AR-15-style rifle at the Earle Cabell Federal Building. He was fatally shot by federal law enforcement. No one else was seriously injured. His family believes Clyde wanted to be killed.

Read More Show Less