Lindsey Graham Says He'll Honor John McCain's Legacy By Pushing To Stay In Afghanistan Forever

Code Red News

With the recent death of legendary Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, many of his colleagues are wondering how they can best honor his legacy. Some think it could be to rename a building in his honor. Others have stood and given passionate speeches in praise of the Republican "Maverick" and Vietnam War hero.


Sen. Lindsey Graham wants to honor him with a war that doesn't end.

On Tuesday, the South Carolina Republican said he would carry on McCain's legacy by lobbying President Donald Trump to keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan, apparently in perpetuity, according to The Washington Examiner.

“I’m going to make sure that the Congress keeps asking the hard questions and try to persuade President Trump if you leave Afghanistan it will blow up in your face, that hoping Syria gets better without a strategy won’t work, and do it in a Lindsey way,” he said.

It's worth noting that after about 17 years, over $1 trillion spent, some 2,350 U.S. troops killed, more than 20,000 wounded, and the untold cost of related medical care and disability pensions, perhaps it was staying in Afghanistan that blew up in our face.

Still, Graham seems to have picked up the torch for McCain, who had become frustrated with a lack of strategy toward victory in Afghanistan and drafted his own in 2017.

The Taliban briefly seized the city of Ghazni earlier this month — sending a message to Afghans that their central government, just 100 miles away in Kabul, can’t protect them — and the one-year-old Trump "South Asia Strategy" hasn’t changed much on the ground in terms of control of districts.

Meanwhile, Army Gen. Austin S. Miller assumes command of the war on Sep. 2, making him the ninth American commander out of 18 total to lead international forces in Afghanistan since 2002.

Army and Air Force Exchange Service officials are warning soldiers and military families to be aware of scammers using the Exchange's logo.

In a news release Wednesday, Exchange officials said scammers using the name "Exchange Inc." have "fooled" soldiers and airmen to broker the sale of used cars, trucks, motorcycles, boats and boat engines.

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KABUL (Reuters) - The Islamic State (IS) militant group claimed responsibility on Sunday for a suicide blast at a wedding reception in Afghanistan that killed 63 people, underlining the dangers the country faces even if the Taliban agrees a pact with the United States.

The Saturday night attack came as the Taliban and the United States try to negotiate an agreement on the withdrawal of U.S. forces in exchange for a Taliban commitment on security and peace talks with Afghanistan's U.S.-backed government.

Islamic State fighters, who first appeared in Afghanistan in 2014 and have since made inroads in the east and north, are not involved in the talks. They are battling government and U.S.-led international forces and the Taliban.

The group, in a statement on the messaging website Telegram, claimed responsibility for the attack at a west Kabul wedding hall in a minority Shi'ite neighborhood, saying its bomber had been able to infiltrate the reception and detonate his explosives in the crowd of "infidels".

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U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Brian Kimball

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Calling aviation geeks in New York City: The British are coming.

In their first visit to the United States since 2008, the Royal Air Force "Red Arrows" will perform an aerial demonstration next week over the Hudson River, according to an Air Force news release. F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, the Air Force Thunderbirds and Navy Blue Angels demonstration teams will also be part of the show.

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U.S. Air National Guard/Staff Sgt. Michelle Y. Alvarez-Rea

Frances and Efrain Santiago, natives of Puerto Rico, wanted to show their support last month for protesters back home seeking to oust the island's governor.

The couple flew the flag of Puerto Rico on the garage of their Kissimmee home. It ticked off the homeowners association.

Someone from the Rolling Hills Estates Homeowners Association left a letter at their home, citing a "flag violation" and warning: "Please rectify the listed violation or you may incur a fine."

Frances Santiago, 38, an Army veteran, demanded to know why.

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Todd Rosenberg/AP

A West Point graduate received a waiver from the U.S. Army to sign with the Philadelphia Eagles on Friday, and play in the NFL while serving as an active-duty soldier.

The waiver for 2nd Lt. Brett Toth was first reported by ESPN's Adam Schefter, who said that Toth signed a three-year deal with the Eagles. Toth graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 2018.

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