This Marine Will Be The Corps 1st Female Lt. General In 9 Years

Bullet Points
Marine Corps / Sgt. Eric Keenan.

Marine Maj. Gen. Loretta Reynolds, currently head of Marine Corps Forces Cyber Command, has been nominated to be the Corps’ first female three-star general in nearly a decade, officials announced recently.


  • The last female three-star general in the Marine Corps was Lt. Gen. Frances Wilson, who served from 1972 to 2009. The Marine Corps' first female three-star general was Carol Mutter, who served from 1967 to 1999. Her last assignment was as head of Manpower and Reserve Affairs.
  • Her nomination was announced on May 18. If confirmed by the Senate, Reynolds would become the new deputy commandant for information leading the Corps’ information operations – a concept that the Marines are still trying to figure out.
  • “Information is power,” Marine Corps spokesman Capt. Christopher Harrison told Task & Purpose in an email. “The speed and reach of information has fundamentally changed the character of modern warfare, and has presented opportunities for the MAGTF [Marine Air-Ground Task Force] is inherently designed to exploit."
  • “As militaries across the globe increasingly rely on technology and information flow to function, it becomes even more important for the Marine Corps to be able to operate and maneuver in this complex and chaotic environment while reducing our own vulnerabilities," he added."

WATCH NEXT:

Editor’s note, 5:30 p.m. EDT: An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported Lt. Gen. Carol Mutter as the Marine Corps' last female three-star general.

FILE PHOTO: The Carl Vinson VA Medical Center iin Dublin, Georgia

RIVIERA BEACH — When a distraught patient opened fire at the VA Medical Center in February, Albert Gaines' long ago military training kicked into gear.

"When I saw the arm come up, I knew what was next, pow, pow, pow," said Gaines, who was doing his job, cleaning patient rooms, when gunfire erupted. "I hit the deck to minimize the target."

Now, three months after what his bosses at the hospital call "the active shooter incident," the 65-year-old Riviera Beach man still feels like a target is on him.

Read More Show Less

President Donald Trump could issue a pardon on Memorial Day for Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, former Special Forces Maj. Matthew Golsteyn, and Marine Scout Snipers accused of urinating on Taliban corpses, the New York Times is reporting.

The White House is working with the Justice Department and military services to get the paperwork necessary for the pardons in order, according to the Times.

Read More Show Less

If the Pentagon had to take Consumer Math class in high school, they'd flunk.

The U.S. military—correction, the U.S. taxpayer—is spending more money to buy fewer weapons. The reason? Poor acquisition practices, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

"DOD's 2018 portfolio of major weapon programs has grown in cost by $8 billion, but contains four fewer systems than last year," GAO found.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on RFE/RL: Afghanistan.

KABUL -- An air strike has mistakenly killed at least nine Afghan police officers, including a commander, during a battle with the Taliban in the southern province of Helmand, local officials say.

They said that 14 officers were also wounded in the May 16 strike in the Nahr-e Saraj district , which is located outside the provincial capital, Lashkar Gah.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army photo)

Chuck Norris contains multitudes.

He's an Oklahoman and an Air Force vet, an actor and martial artist. The intensity of his badassery formed the basis of one of the earliest and most ubiquitous internet memes. He's a fictional member of Delta Force and a Texas Ranger, his beard a source of such virile endurance and strength that it makes Samson's biblical mane look like a bouquet of hobo pubes.

Now, Norris will live forever as the ultimate instrument of righteousness: an M1 Abrams tank.

Read More Show Less