The M41A Pulse Rifle From ‘Aliens’ Is Real Thanks To These Firearms Manufacturers

Gear
Image via 20th Century Fox

An iconic science-fiction firearm, the M41A pulse rifle is the standard-issue weapon of the Colonial Marines, the ill-fated, but unquestionably badass protagonists in James Cameron’s 1986 blockbuster: “Aliens.”


Because of its huge popularity — I mean come on, that thing is way more badass than a blaster from “Star Wars”a number of gun aficionados and sci-fi fans have made their own versions of the combo-pulse rifle and grenade launcher over the years, and the videos are again making the rounds. On June 2, BLK RFL DIV, dug up this video from 2014, showing a pulse rifle by Lage Manufacturing, LLC.

The pulse rifle from Lage weighs in at 14 pounds and is a combination 9mm submachine gun affixed to a short-barreled 12-gauge shotgun. It holds 50 rounds in a "coffin" magazine, and even has a LED counter on the side, so you can visibly watch your ammo deplete as you annihilate hordes of imaginary Xenomorphs at the range. But, it’s hardly the only one out there, with the occasional hobbyist taking to YouTube to show off his own version of the mainstay of the Colonial Marines’ arsenal.

Like this one, made with an M1A1 Thompson and a Remington 12-gauge shotgun:

These custom-made pulse rifles are actually closer to the “real” thing than you might think. The original M41A pulse rifles used in “Aliens” were made from an M1A1 Thompson and fitted with a cut-down Remington 870 shotgun, with the heat shield and foregrip from a Franchi SPAS-12, plus a bit of rubber and plastic tossed in here and there.

If “Aliens” is less your style, but you still think the only good bug is a dead bug, don’t fret: Someone else has figured out how to make the Morita Assault rifle wielded by Johnny Rico from "Starship Troopers."

Army Sgt. Jeremy Seals died on Oct. 31, 2018, following a protracted battle with stomach cancer. His widow, Cheryl Seals is mounting a lawsuit alleging that military care providers missed her husband's cancer. Task & Purpose photo illustration by Aaron Provost

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In an uh-oh episode of historic proportions, hand grenades from the last major battle of the Revolutionary War recently and repeatedly scrambled bomb squads in Virginia's capital city.

Wait – they had hand grenades in the Revolutionary War? Indeed. Hollow iron balls, filled with black powder, outfitted with a fuse, then lit and thrown.

And more than two dozen have been sitting in cardboard boxes at the Department of Historic Resources, undetected for 30 years.

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(From left to right) Chris Osman, Chris McKinley, Kent Kroeker, and Talon Burton

At least four American veterans were among a group of eight men arrested by police in Haiti earlier this week for driving without license plates and possessing an arsenal of weaponry and tactical gear.

Police in Port-au-Prince arrested five Americans, two Serbians, and one Haitian man at a police checkpoint on Sunday, according to The Miami-Herald. The men told police they were on a "government mission" but did not specify for which government, according to The Herald.

They also told police that "their boss was going to call their boss," implying that someone high in Haiti's government would vouch for them and secure their release, Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles told NPR.

What they were actually doing or who they were potentially working for remains unclear. A State Department spokesperson told Task & Purpose they were aware that Haitian police arrested a "group of individuals, including some U.S. citizens," but declined to answer whether the men were employed by or operating under contract with the U.S. government.

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A Coast Guard lieutenant arrested this week planned to "murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country," according to a court filing requesting he be detained until his trial.

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(Getty Images/Spencer Grant)

(Reuters Health) - Military service members who are at risk for suicide may be less likely to attempt to harm themselves when they receive supportive text messages, a U.S. study suggests.

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