How To Make Rope Handcuffs In Less Than 30 Seconds

popular
How to make handcuffs with paracord.

I live and work in Manhattan, so I don’t consider myself to be much of an outdoor person. As a kid, I grew up in Norfolk, Virginia and went camping every summer, but I have very minimal understanding of how to overcome a situation that is more dangerous than a hurricane. So, here is my attempt to learn some survival skills.


Traditional handcuffs are made from steel, but today I learned that you can restrain someone with much less. In case a situation ever arises wherein you need to bind someone’s hands or feet, paracord or twine will do the job. All you really need to know is how to tie a prusik knot.

Start with paracord, and cut enough to wrap around the average wrist twice.

Tie a double prusik knot around your pointer finger. In case you, like me, have never been a Boy Scout or tied a knot that wasn’t a shoelace, there are about a thousand YouTube videos that will show you this technique.

Now that you have the knot tied, take the two ends and loop them through after removing your finger. These two loops become your cuffs.

After slipping their hands through the loops, you can use the ends to tighten the cuffs.

It seems simple enough, right?

Maybe.

The cuffs aren’t the hard part. It would be much more difficult, at least for me, to subdue someone long enough to be able to restrain them in the first place. But, should I find the time to also take some sort of self-defense class and move away from gentrified Williamsburg, this might be a lucrative skill to have.

Photo: Twitter

For an organization that is constantly shining a light on things that would rather be kept out of the public eye, the moderators of U.S. Army WTF! Moments have done a remarkably impressive job at staying anonymous.

That is, until Monday.

Read More Show Less

For U.S. service members who have fought alongside the Kurds, President Donald Trump's decision to approve repositioning U.S. forces in Syria ahead of Turkey's invasion is a naked betrayal of valued allies.

"I am ashamed for the first time in my career," one unnamed special operator told Fox News Jennifer Griffin.

In a Twitter thread that went viral, Griffin wrote the soldier told her the Kurds were continuing to support the United States by guarding tens of thousands of ISIS prisoners even though Turkey had nullified an arrangement under which U.S. and Turkish troops were conducting joint patrols in northeastern Syria to allow the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, to withdraw.

"The Kurds are sticking by us," the soldier told Griffin. "No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us."

Read More Show Less

Defense Secretary Mark Esper has confirmed that a nightmare scenario has come to pass: Captured ISIS fighters are escaping as a result of Turkey's invasion of Kurdish-held northeast Syria.

Turkey's incursion has led to "the release of many dangerous ISIS detainees," Esper said in a statement on Monday.

Read More Show Less
ABC News anchor Tom Llamas just before his network airs grossly inaccurate footage

Video footage of a purported "bombing of Kurd civilians" by Turkish military forces shown on ABC News appeared to be a nighttime firing of tracer rounds at a Kentucky gun range.

Read More Show Less

The U.S. military's seemingly never-ending mission supporting civil authorities along the southwestern border will last at least another year.

On Sept. 3, Defense Secretary Mark Esper approved a request from the Department of Homeland Security to provide a total of up to 5,500 troops along the border until Sept. 30, 2020, Lt. Gen. Laura Richardson, commander of U.S. Army North, said on Monday.

Read More Show Less