Marine Raider convicted of misdemeanor assault for punching his girlfriend several times

news

A special operations Marine accused of punching his girlfriend will face up to 60 days in jail after being convicted in a North Carolina court of assault inflicting serious injury, a misdemeanor offense, Task & Purpose has learned.

Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was also found not guilty of assault on a female, which is also a misdemeanor, said Samantha Dooies, an assistant to the New Hanover County District Attorney.


Evans is expected to be sentenced on Monday by District Court Judge Chad Hogston, Dooies told Task & Purpose. Separately, Evans is slated to appear in civil court regarding a domestic violence order of protection filed by his former girlfriend.

Hogston decided to wait for the civil matter to be resolved before deciding Evans' sentence, Dooies said.

The judge will take into account that Evans has no criminal record when determining Evans' punishment, which could range from probation to time in jail.

Police in Wilmington, North Carolina, arrested Evans on July 29, 2018 after responding to a domestic assault. Kimberly Rhine, his girlfriend at the time, told police that he had punched her "multiple times."

Evans was released from jail the following day.

Rhine told Task & Purpose that she was shocked Evans was not convicted of assault on a female, which she described as a minimal charge that should not have been difficult to prove.

In January, she posted a picture on Facebook of her bloodied face with a gash above her left eye, which she said Evans caused by hitting her.

"It's become a felony now to abuse an animal but if it's a loved one it's totally OK, which I just can't really wrap my head around it," Rhine said.

Evans' attorney William Peregoy declined to comment until after Monday's sentencing.

Evans is still assigned to Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, said MARSOC spokeswoman Maj. Kristin Tortorici.

"In an effort to not interfere with the civilian justice system, Marine Forces Special Operations Command is awaiting the completion of the civilian legal proceedings in this case before determining any disciplinary or administrative actions regarding Staff Sgt. Evans," Tortorici said.

SEE ALSO: Marine gets 'adverse administrative action' for blaming statutory rape on underage girls

WATCH NEXT: Commandant Gen. Robert Neller Talks Social Media Misconduct

DOD photo

After a string of high profile incidents, the commander overseeing the Navy SEALs released an all hands memo stating that the elite Naval Special Warfare community has a discipline problem, and pinned the blame on those who place loyalty to their teammates over the Navy and the nation they serve.

Read More Show Less
Ed Mahoney/Kickstarter

In June 2011 Iraq's defense minister announced that U.S. troops who had deployed to the country would receive the Iraq Commitment Medal in recognition of their service. Eight years later, millions of qualified veterans have yet to receive it.

The reason: The Iraqi government has so far failed to provide the medals to the Department of Defense for approval and distribution.

A small group of veterans hopes to change that.

Read More Show Less
F-16 Fighting Falcon (Photo: US Air Force)

For a cool $8.5 million, you could be the proud owner of a "fully functioning" F-16 A/B Fighting Falcon fighter jet that a South Florida company acquired from Jordan.

The combat aircraft, which can hit a top speed of 1,357 mph at 40,000 feet, isn't showroom new — it was built in 1980. But it still has a max range of 2,400 miles and an initial climb rate of 62,000 feet per minute and remains militarized, according to The Drive, an automotive website that also covers defense topics, WBDO News 96.5 reported Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
FILE PHOTO: Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with FIFA President Gianni Infantino at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia February 20, 2019. Yuri Kadobnov/Pool via REUTERS

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian authorities said on Friday that a doctor who treated those injured in a mysterious accident this month had the radioactive isotope Caesium-137 in his body, but said it was probably put there by his diet.

The deadly accident at a military site in northern Russia took place on Aug. 8 and caused a brief spurt of radiation. Russian President Vladimir Putin later said it occurred during testing of what he called promising new weapons systems.

Read More Show Less