A Marine Corps Gunner Lays Out What It Means To Wear The Bursting Bomb

Community
"Every day I get up in the morning trying to be good enough to hold that title."
Screenshot via DVIDS


Few Marines know firearms better than a gunner, a specific designation for warrant officers in the infantry field, easily identified by their pineapple bursting-bomb insignia (on those occasions when you actually, you know, see one.) That and the vice-like grip they typically have on a cup of coffee.

In his most recent video, Chief Warrant Officer Christian Wade, the 2nd Marine Division’s resident gunner, lays out what it takes to be the go-to firearms expert in a service that prides itself on every Marine being a rifleman.

“If one is truly humble and willing to improve, is one ever a master?” Wade says in the video, as the camera cuts between shots of the salty senior Marine philosophizing in a poncho-draped lawn chair behind a pickup truck and running shooting drills at a range. “Because I can tell you this, I’m not a master, but I want to be, and I’ll do what it takes to get better and better. I think mastery is more of a journey, more of a state of mind, than it is an actual thing.”

Related: How To Zero A Rifle Like A Marine Corps Gunner »

The newest video is the first in a three-part series focusing on Wade’s role as a division gunner, and part of a larger project called “Gunner’s Fact or Fiction” where he answers questions on everything from how well the Glock 19 measures up to the M9 Beretta and tips on getting a perfect battlefield zero. However, the newest clip is a bit of a departure from past videos, with fewer rounds down range and more rumination on what it takes to excel in a field where the stakes are, understandably, very high.

“Being the gunner in the 2nd Marine Division, what it means to me is: every day I get up in the morning trying to be good enough to hold that title,” Wade says. “What drives me in everything I can do is the fact that I don’t want to be unworthy of standing in front of a platoon of Marines.”

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Two military bases in Florida and one in Arizona will see heat indexes over 100 degrees four months out of every year if steps aren't taken to reduce carbon emissions, a new study warns.

Read More Show Less

This Veterans Day, two post-9/11 veterans-turned congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation to have a memorial commemorating the Global War on Terrorism built on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Read More Show Less

Between 500 and 600 U.S. troops are expected to remain in Syria when all is said and done, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley said on Sunday.

Milley's comments on ABC News' "This Week" indicate the U.S. military's footprint in Syria will end up being roughly half the size it was before Turkey invaded Kurdish-held northeast Syria last month.

Read More Show Less
Democratic presidential candidate South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a fund-raising fish fry for U.S. Rep. Abby Finkenauer (D-Iowa), Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at Hawkeye Downs Expo Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Associated Press/Charlie Neibergall)

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — On Veterans Day, Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg is proposing a "veteran-centric" Department of Veterans Affairs that will honor the service of the men and women of the military who represent "the best of who we are and what we can be."

Buttigieg, who served as a Navy intelligence officer in Afghanistan, said service members are united by a "shared commitment to support and defend the United States" and in doing so they set an example "for us and the world, about the potential of the American experiment."

Read More Show Less
Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks during a Climate Crisis Summit with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (not pictured) at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. November 9, 2019. (Reuters/Scott Morgan)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democratic presidential contender Bernie Sanders promised on Monday to boost healthcare services for military veterans if he is elected, putting a priority on upgrading facilities and hiring more doctors and nurses for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

To mark Monday's Veterans Day holiday honoring those who served in the military, Sanders vowed to fill nearly 50,000 slots for doctors, nurses and other medical professionals at facilities run by Veterans Affairs during his first year in office.

Sanders also called for at least $62 billion in new funding to repair, modernize and rebuild hospitals and clinics to meet what he called the "moral obligation" of providing quality care for those who served in the military.

Read More Show Less