A Marine Corps Gunner Lays Out What It Means To Wear The Bursting Bomb

Community
"Every day I get up in the morning trying to be good enough to hold that title."
Screenshot via DVIDS


Few Marines know firearms better than a gunner, a specific designation for warrant officers in the infantry field, easily identified by their pineapple bursting-bomb insignia (on those occasions when you actually, you know, see one.) That and the vice-like grip they typically have on a cup of coffee.

In his most recent video, Chief Warrant Officer Christian Wade, the 2nd Marine Division’s resident gunner, lays out what it takes to be the go-to firearms expert in a service that prides itself on every Marine being a rifleman.

“If one is truly humble and willing to improve, is one ever a master?” Wade says in the video, as the camera cuts between shots of the salty senior Marine philosophizing in a poncho-draped lawn chair behind a pickup truck and running shooting drills at a range. “Because I can tell you this, I’m not a master, but I want to be, and I’ll do what it takes to get better and better. I think mastery is more of a journey, more of a state of mind, than it is an actual thing.”

Related: How To Zero A Rifle Like A Marine Corps Gunner »

The newest video is the first in a three-part series focusing on Wade’s role as a division gunner, and part of a larger project called “Gunner’s Fact or Fiction” where he answers questions on everything from how well the Glock 19 measures up to the M9 Beretta and tips on getting a perfect battlefield zero. However, the newest clip is a bit of a departure from past videos, with fewer rounds down range and more rumination on what it takes to excel in a field where the stakes are, understandably, very high.

“Being the gunner in the 2nd Marine Division, what it means to me is: every day I get up in the morning trying to be good enough to hold that title,” Wade says. “What drives me in everything I can do is the fact that I don’t want to be unworthy of standing in front of a platoon of Marines.”

Roughly a dozen U.S. troops showing concussion-related symptoms are being medically evacuated from Al-Asad Air Base in Iraq to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, a defense official told Task & Purpose on Tuesday.

Read More

In a Galaxy — err, I mean, on a military base far, far away, soldiers are standing in solidarity with galactic freedom fighters.

Sitting at the top of an Army press release from March 2019, regarding the East Africa Response Force's deployment to Gabon, the photo seems, at first glance, just like any other: Soldiers on the move.

But if you look closer at the top right, you'll find something spectacular: A Rebel Alliance flag.

Read More
The maiden flight of the first CMV-22B Osprey took place in Amarillo, Texas (Courtesy photo)

The first of the CMV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft the Navy plans on adopting as its carrier onboard delivery (COD) aircraft of choice has successfully completed its first flight operations, manufacturer Boeing announced on Tuesday.

Read More
A soldier plugs his ears during a live fire mission at Yakima Training Center. Photo: Capt. Leslie Reed/U.S. Army

Another 300 lawsuits against 3M flooded federal courts this month as more military veterans accuse the behemoth manufacturer of knowingly making defective earplugs that caused vets to lose hearing during combat in Iraq or Afghanistan or while training on U.S. military bases.

On another front, 3M also is fighting lawsuits related to a class of chemicals known as PFAS, with the state of Michigan filing a lawsuit last week against the Maplewood-based company.

To date, nearly 2,000 U.S. veterans from Minnesota to California and Texas have filed more than 1,000 lawsuits.

Read More

GENEVA (Reuters) - North Korea said on Tuesday it was no longer bound by commitments to halt nuclear and missile testing, blaming the United States' failure to meet a year-end deadline for nuclear talks and "brutal and inhumane" U.S. sanctions.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un set an end-December deadline for denuclearization talks with the United States and White House national security adviser Robert O'Brien said at the time the United States had opened channels of communication.

O'Brien said then he hoped Kim would follow through on denuclearization commitments he made at summits with U.S. President Donald Trump.

Read More