Marines are finally getting the grenade launcher that civilians have rocked in 'Battlefield' for a decade

Military Tech
Marines Test New Grenade Launcher Module

Marines are finally getting their hands on a 40mm grenade launcher that both Army soldiers — and civilian fans of the Battlefield video game franchise — have enjoyed for a decade.


After years of testing, the Marine Corps is poised to field the M320A1 grenade launcher to infantry squads as a replacement for the underslung M203, the latest much-needed update to the service's Vietnam-era arsenal in pursuit of delicious lethality.

"The M320A1 will provide good range and accuracy, making the infantry squad more lethal," said Lt. Col. Tim Hough, program manager for Infantry Weapons in Marine Corps Systems Command's Ground Combat Element Systems, said in a Marine Corps Systems Command release.

As Military.com notes, the Army has been rocking the M320 series of bloopers for the last decade, which offers maximum effective ranges of 150 and 350 meters on point and area targets respectively and designed with a separate pistol grip for both underslung and stand-alone configurations.

"The functionality of the M320A1 makes it unique," Hough said in the release. "The mounted version of the M320A1 is a capability we're currently working on so that Marines have that option should they want it."

A handful of Marines finally received the M320 for testing back in 2017, with plans to first field the new launcher to infantry squads followed by combat engineer squads, reconnaissance teams, Light Armored Reconnaissance companies.

But, as Task & Purpose reported at the time, Marines may already have some decent experience with the M320 from their barracks staycations: after all, the M320 has been a fixture of the Battlefield franchise since its first full appearance in 2010's Battlefield 3.

The M320 is expected to make its way into Marine hands in fiscal year 2020. And remember: When you finally pick up your shiny new grenade launcher, don't forget to comment, subscribe, and smash that like button!

SEE ALSO: A History Of 'Bloopers': Rifle Grenades, 'Thumpers,' And Underslung Launchers

WATCH NEXT: How To Zero An M203, According To Medal Of Honor Recipient Flo Groberg

U.S. Air Force Col. Jeannie Leavitt, the outgoing commander of the 4th Fighter Wing, pilots an F-15E Strike Eagle aircraft over North Carolina May 29, 2014. (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman John Nieves Camacho)

WASHINGTON — Former Air Force and Navy fighter pilots are calling on the military to begin cancer screenings for aviators as young as 30 because of an increase in deaths from the disease that they suspect may be tied to radiation emitted in the cockpit.

"We are dropping like flies in our 50s from aggressive cancers," said retired Air Force Col. Eric Nelson, a former F-15E Strike Eagle weapons officer. He cited prostate and esophageal cancers, lymphoma, and glioblastomas that have struck fellow pilots he knew, commanded or flew with.

Read More Show Less

Army and Air Force Exchange Service officials are warning soldiers and military families to be aware of scammers using the Exchange's logo.

In a news release Wednesday, Exchange officials said scammers using the name "Exchange Inc." have "fooled" soldiers and airmen to broker the sale of used cars, trucks, motorcycles, boats and boat engines.

Read More Show Less

KABUL (Reuters) - The Islamic State (IS) militant group claimed responsibility on Sunday for a suicide blast at a wedding reception in Afghanistan that killed 63 people, underlining the dangers the country faces even if the Taliban agrees a pact with the United States.

The Saturday night attack came as the Taliban and the United States try to negotiate an agreement on the withdrawal of U.S. forces in exchange for a Taliban commitment on security and peace talks with Afghanistan's U.S.-backed government.

Islamic State fighters, who first appeared in Afghanistan in 2014 and have since made inroads in the east and north, are not involved in the talks. They are battling government and U.S.-led international forces and the Taliban.

The group, in a statement on the messaging website Telegram, claimed responsibility for the attack at a west Kabul wedding hall in a minority Shi'ite neighborhood, saying its bomber had been able to infiltrate the reception and detonate his explosives in the crowd of "infidels".

Read More Show Less
U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Brian Kimball

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Calling aviation geeks in New York City: The British are coming.

In their first visit to the United States since 2008, the Royal Air Force "Red Arrows" will perform an aerial demonstration next week over the Hudson River, according to an Air Force news release. F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, the Air Force Thunderbirds and Navy Blue Angels demonstration teams will also be part of the show.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Air National Guard/Staff Sgt. Michelle Y. Alvarez-Rea

Frances and Efrain Santiago, natives of Puerto Rico, wanted to show their support last month for protesters back home seeking to oust the island's governor.

The couple flew the flag of Puerto Rico on the garage of their Kissimmee home. It ticked off the homeowners association.

Someone from the Rolling Hills Estates Homeowners Association left a letter at their home, citing a "flag violation" and warning: "Please rectify the listed violation or you may incur a fine."

Frances Santiago, 38, an Army veteran, demanded to know why.

Read More Show Less