Marine Vet Who Took Down Armed Robber Says He Followed His Instincts

news
Screenshot via YouTube

A firefighter and former Marine by the name of Daniel Gaskey, 30, took down an armed robber with his bare hands in a convenience store on June 26, and it was all caught on tape. The attempted robbery took place in the early morning at the Exxon Oasis Food Store in Midlothian, Texas.


Recently released surveillance video shows Gaskey, who works at the fire department in Mansfield, Texas, waiting in line when a man comes into the store wearing a black mask.

Gaskey told Task & Purpose that he often stops at the gas station, and didn’t think anything was out of the ordinary until the man — who was later identified as 19-year-old Dylan Bearden according to NBC News — put his hand on Gaskey’s shoulder and pushed him aside.

“My initial thought is ‘Why are you touching me? Why are you pushing me out of the way?’” recounted Gaskey, who served as an intelligence Marine from 2003–2011, and deployed to Iraq for nine months in 2005 with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment.

Photo courtesy of Daniel Gaskey

“I took a step away to see what’s going on,” continued Gaskey, who said that Bearden then brandished a fix-blade knife and told the cashier: “This will go quick and easy, I’m just here for the money.”

This is when he decided to make his move. According to Gaskey, Bearden had his back to him, and the clerk was far enough away from the knife that a stray swing wouldn’t hit her.

“He was completely ignoring me, so after that it was an instinctive reaction,” Gaskey said.

It all happens in a matter of seconds, and in the video you see Gaskey size Bearden up before springing into action. The former Marine throws his arm around the robber’s neck and has him on the ground in a matter of seconds. Gaskey then pins him down and removes the knife from his possession. Gaskey said he held Bearden on the floor for about five minutes until police arrived.

“I’ve always had a protective nature. I’ve always been someone who was willing to stand up for what’s right, and that’s what took me into the Marine Corps,” Gaskey said, when asked what led him to not one, but two careers in public service. “Coming out of the Marine Corps, I didn’t see myself doing an [office job] for the rest of my life, and I knew I’d either be a cop or a firefighter.”

Watch the video below.

A pair of U.S. Navy Grumman F-14A Tomcat aircraft from Fighter Squadron VF-211 Fighting Checkmates in flight over Iraq in 2003/Department of Defense

Since the sequel to the 1986 action flick (and wildly successful Navy recruitment tool) Top Gun, was announced, there's been a lot of speculation on what Top Gun: Maverick will be about when it premieres in June 2020. While the plot is still relatively unclear, we know Tom Cruise will reprise his role as Naval aviator Pete "Maverick" Mitchell, and he'll be joined by a recognizable costar: The iconic F-14 Tomcat.

It looks like the old war plane will be coming out of retirement for more than just a cameo. A number of recently surfaced photos show an F-14 Tomcat aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt, alongside Cruise and members of the film's production crew, the Drive's Tyler Rogoway first reported earlier this week.

Read More Show Less

D-Day veteran James McCue died a hero. About 500 strangers made sure of it.

"It's beautiful," Army Sgt. Pete Rooney said of the crowd that gathered in the cold and stood on the snow Thursday during McCue's burial. "I wish it happened for every veteran's funeral."

Read More Show Less

President Donald Trump claims the $6.1 billion from the Defense Department's budget that he will now spend on his border wall was not going to be used for anything "important."

Trump announced on Friday that he was declaring a national emergency, allowing him to tap into military funding to help pay for barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Read More Show Less

Every once in a while, we run across a photo in The Times-Picayune archives that's so striking that it begs a simple question: "What in the name of Momus Alexander Morgus is going on in this New Orleans photograph?" When we do, we've decided, we're going to share it — and to attempt to answer that question.

Read More Show Less
Members of the Syrian Democratic Forces control the monitor of their drone at their advanced position, during the fighting with Islamic State's fighters in Nazlat Shahada, a district of Raqqa. (Reuters/Zohra Bensemra)

MUSCAT (Reuters) - The United States should keep arming and aiding the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) following the planned U.S. withdrawal from Syria, provided the group keeps up the pressure on Islamic State, a senior U.S. general told Reuters on Friday.

Read More Show Less