Mattis Kicked Off His Memorial Day Weekend By Keeping It Humble At The White House Mess

Leadership

It's common knowledge that Secretary of Defense James Mattis embodies the humility and empathy we've come to expect from modern military leaders. He does laundry in the Pentagon basement, forgoes appearances on cable news, and praises the U.S. service members under his responsibility at every possible moment.


So when a DoD spokesman tweeted on Saturday that Mattis spent the Friday morning before Memorial Day weekend serving breakfast to White House employees, well, we're inclined to believe it.

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According to White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the personnel in charge of the mess declined to let the legendary Marine anywhere near the grill.

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We're at least hoping he was at least able to serve up all the Tabasco he wanted.

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