Lawmakers introduce bill to build monument to Medal of Honor recipients in Washington DC

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The Medal of Honor (U.S. Navy photo)

A pair of Texas congressmen have introduced legislation to the House to create a monument "to honor the valiant service" of Medal of Honor recipients in Washington, D.C.


  • The legislation, introduced by Democrat Marc Veasey and Republican Ron Wright, would also recognize Arlington, Texas as the home of the new National Medal of Honor Museum.
  • More than 3,500 U.S. service members have received the Medal of Honor since it became a permanent military decoration in February 1863.
  • "These men and women went above and beyond the call of duty on the battlefield in order to preserve our values and way of life," said Wright in a statement. "Because of their contributions and patriotism, these heroic individuals deserve to be memorialized with a monument in our nation's capital."
  • "I am honored to introduce this legislation that will honor these brave men and women for risking their lives to protect our democracy," Veasey said.
  • The National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation, which would oversea the new monument, hopes that construction will take just five years once the project gets the necessary authorization by Congress.
  • "We look forward to working with the bipartisan contingent of elected officials to make sure we are doing all that we can to honor the more than 3,500 Medal of Honor recipients and get this great piece of legislation passed," foundation CEO Joe Daniels said in a statement.

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