(U.S. Army/Mike Strasser)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on ProPublica.

In patriotism-drenched promotions, press releases and tweets, TurboTax promotes special deals for military service members, promising to help them file their taxes online for free or at a discount.

Yet some service members who've filed by going to the TurboTax Military landing page told ProPublica they were charged as much as $150 — even though, under a deal with the government, service members making under $66,000 are supposed to be able to file on TurboTax for free.

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President Donald Trump wants to give service members their biggest pay raise in a decade.

The Defense Department's proposed $718 billion budget for fiscal 2020 includes a 3.1 percent pay raise, according to the Office of Management and Budget. That compares with the 2.6 percent pay hike that troops received starting in January.

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Swab tests at residences in Fort Benning, Georgia, U.S. reveal in red the presence of lead in this undated handout photo obtained by FOIA from the US Army, received by Reuters August 15, 2018. (U.S. Army FOIA/Reuters)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A new survey of military families living on U.S. bases found most are dissatisfied with their housing, often citing serious health and safety hazards – results that counter years of Pentagon reports claiming soaring satisfaction rates among military housing tenants.

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A Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WMSL 755) crew member mans the rails as the cutter leaves Honiara, Solomon Islands, Nov. 29, 2018. (U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew West)

Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Some Coast Guard families began receiving back pay Monday while bracing for the possibility that another government shutdown Feb. 15 could again leave them scrambling to cover bills and put food on the table.

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A soldier reads through a tax preparation booklet. (U.S. Army/ Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

As troops sit down to file their 2018 income tax returns, the Defense Department wants them to know that some significant changes in tax law could put more money in their pockets.

But to maximize their refund, they should know about several new rules.

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U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Chad Strohmeyer

This article by Amy Bushatz originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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