Military Spouses Should Enjoy Same Gun Rights As Service Members, Congressman Says

Family & Relationships

Legislation introduced Thursday would make it easier for military spouses to purchase guns wherever their active-duty husband or wife is permanently stationed.


Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, introduced the bill, titled “Protect Our Military Families’ 2nd Amendment Rights Act.”

Active-duty service members are exempt from gun control laws that mandate U.S. citizens purchase firearms in the state where they live. Farenthold’s measure would grant spouses the same exemption. Laws now do not extend to husbands and wives, who must first establish residency in a state before purchasing a gun.

“A lot of military spouses don’t want to change their driver’s license or home of record for two years,” said Elizabeth Peace, Farenthold’s communications director. “Military spouses still have Second Amendment rights, and this should’ve been done when military members were given the exemption. It’s unfortunate it took a while for people to think of the spouses.”

Identical legislation was introduced in 2015. It stalled after being referred to subcommittee.

At the time, former Virginia Rep. Scott Rigell, a Republican who introduced it, said he did so in response to threats to the military community from the Islamic State group.

———

© 2017 the Stars and Stripes. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Thomas Mudd.

President Donald Trump announced on Tuesday that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan will "not to go forward with his confirmation process."

Trump said that Army Secretary Mark Esper will now serve as acting defense secretary.

Read More Show Less

The day of the Army is upon us.

Secretary of the Army Mark Esper will be taking over as Acting Secretary of Defense, President Trump announced on Tuesday, as Patrick Shanahan withdrew his nomination.

The comes just a couple of months after Army Chief of Staff Mark Milley was officially nominated to take over as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs.

An defense official familiar with the matter confirmed to Task & Purpose that Army Undersecretary Ryan McCarthy will "more than likely" become Acting Army Secretary — his second time in that position.

Read More Show Less

As a Medal of Honor recipient, former Army Staff Sgt. David Bellavia will also be eligible for retroactive monthly pension payments stretching back to 2004.

All Medal of Honor recipients receive a pension starting on the date they formally receive the Medal of Honor, which is currently $1,329.58 per month, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

But Medal of Honor recipients are also eligible for a retroactive payment for monthly stipends that technically took effect on the "date of heroism," said Gina Jackson, a spokeswoman for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Read More Show Less
(Reuters/Nick Oxford)

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A unit of UK infrastructure giant Balfour Beatty plc falsified housing maintenance records at a major U.S. military base to help it maximize fees earned from the Department of Defense, a Reuters investigation found.

At Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma, the company's U.S.-based unit used a second set of books and altered records to make it appear responsive to maintenance requests, Reuters found in a review of company and Air Force emails, internal memos and other documents, as well as interviews with former workers.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. William Boecker)

The Minnesota National Guard will not expel a 19-year-old Chaska man with ties to a nationwide white supremacist organization, following an investigation into his online activities before he enlisted.

However, the Guard said the man will remain under close supervision.

Read More Show Less