Glock may have walked away from the U.S. Army's turbulent Modular Handgun System competition licking its wounds, but that doesn't mean other core NATO partners are following the Pentagon's lead when it comes to new sidearms.

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WASHINGTON, DC — Textron Systems, its subsidiary Howe & Howe, and FLIR Systems, Inc. unveiled their bid for a new Army robotic combat vehicle Monday — the Ripsaw M5, a well-armed tracked vehicle equipped with high-end sensors that can deploy unmanned air and ground assets like a drone mothership.

This robotic combat vehicle design was on display Monday at the Association of the United States Army conference in Washington, DC.

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A soldier stole a 155mm artillery round and concealed it among his possessions before admitting to the theft six years later, according to an Army Crime Report for Fiscal Year 2018 that was obtained by Task & Purpose.

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Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Sikorsky has two goals in mind for its optionally manned S-70 helicopter: to make the autonomous technology easy to retrofit on existing aircraft for users like the U.S. Army, and to give pilots various modes of autonomy so they can commit more time toward their mission, according to company officials.

Sikorsky's original S-70 helicopter model would become the Army's UH-60 Black Hawk and spawn a family of helicopters used by multiple military services.

The company, now a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., this week said it's progressing through its flight test program by incorporating more autonomy software and sensors onto the aircraft, with a fully autonomous flight projected sometime in 2020, said Igor Cherepinsky, Sikorsky Director of Autonomy

"We will show the world that this is capable... [of] being operated from the ground sometime next year," Cherepinsky said in a phone call with reporters Monday.

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The USS Zumwalt will "the largest and most technologically advanced surface combatant in the world," according to the Navy — if it ever ends up seeing action.

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America's lean, mean fighting machine may get a bit more lean in the coming years when it comes to ammunition. The Marine Corps is close to picking up a new polymer ammo for its tried-and-true M2 Browning .50 caliber machine gun to lighten the load for grunts downrange.

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