The US Postal Service is honoring military working dogs with new ‘forever’ stamp

History

The U.S. Postal Service release these four new stamps featuring military working dogs on Aug. 1, 2019.

(U.S. Postal Service)

It's a doggy dog world for the United States Postal Service.

The United States federal government's independent postal agency officially released a new set of Forever Stamps in honor of the nation's brave and loyal canines with the Military Working Dogs on Thursday.


In the booklet of 20, each block of four patriotic stamps feature stylized geometric illustrations of breeds commonly serving with America's armed forces; German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever, Dutch Shepherd and Belgian Malinois.

"Brave and loyal military working dogs are essential members of America's armed forces. Courageous canines have aided U.S. soldiers in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Afghanistan and Iraq wars," the USPS wrote online.


(U.S. Postal Service)

Thursday's first-day-of-issue event took place during the American Philatelic Society Stamp Show in Omaha, Neb.

"As a military veteran and former law enforcement officer, I have the greatest appreciation for these animals and the service they provide," said David C. Williams, vice chairman of the U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors, who served as the dedicating official for the ceremony.

"Today, these dogs are born and raised to serve alongside soldiers, sailors, marines, airmen and women, and members of the Coast Guard. They are heroes deserving of our respect and gratitude."

The stamps are red, white, blue and gold to represent the American flag and patriotism and have a white star on the background.

The Los Angeles-based DKNG Studios created the stamp artwork from hand-sketching the dogs and then using Adobe Illustrator.

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©2019 New York Daily News. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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