A Chinese team got kicked out of the Military World Games in China for 'extensive cheating'

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A Chinese team got kicked out of the Military World Games in China after accusations of "extensive cheating" from six European nations.

On Monday, China took gold, silver, and fourth place in the women's Middle Distance orienteering challenge in Wuhan, as well as silver in the men's event.

But their celebrations were short-lived.

"The Middle Distance competition was unfortunately overshadowed by extensive cheating by the Chinese team," the International Orienteering Federation (IOF) said in a press release.


Recruits from the People's Liberation Army (PLA) at a training exercise in 2011. (Reuters photo)


The IOF said it was "discovered and proven" that Chinese runners "received illegal assistance both by spectators in the terrain, markings, and small paths prepared for them and which only they were aware of."

The national teams of Russia, Switzerland, France, Belgium, Poland, and Austria submitted a formal complaint, and the jury disqualified everyone in the home orienteering team.

Business Insider contacted The People's Liberation Army and China's Ministry of Defense for comment, but is yet to receive a response.

The IOF said it rejected an appeal from China.

Athletes from Russia's military were then awarded gold in both the men's and women's event.Orienteering is a foot race involving small teams, who use a compass and map to navigate a path through complex terrain to a finish line.

The Military World Games are an annual event which see several armed forces compete in a variety of summer and winter sports.

This year's event ran from October 18 to October 27, and was opened with a ceremony attended by Chinese president Xi Jinping.

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