This Former Miss America Just Joined The Air Force

Joining the Military
Miss America Teresa Scanlon
DoD

A former Miss America winner announced Tuesday that she enlisted in the U.S. Air Force.


Teresa Scanlon, who won the Miss America pageant in 2011, is now an Airman First Class in the Air National Guard, according to The Press of Atlantic City.

"I am beyond honored and humbled to announce that I am now officially an A1C in the Air National Guard and graduated Air Force Basic Training as an Honor Graduate (top 10%) last weekend," Scanlon wrote on Instagram. "The title of "airman" is one I proudly hold and I hope to represent the Air Force well."

&taken-by;=teresascanlan

Scanlon, who is also a law student at UC Berkley, is no stranger to the military.

Since winning the pageant, she has done several USO tours, visited Walter Reed and Bethesda military hospitals and several military installations.

Here's some of what Scanlon did with the military before joining:

Scanlon signs autographs for sailors aboard the USS Cape St. George in 2012.

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Scanlon speaks with a sailor in the USS Cape St. George's general store in 2012.

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Scanlon performs for the USS Abraham Lincoln crew in 2011.

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Scanlon on the USS Abraham Lincoln's flight deck in 2011.

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