This NASA-Engineered Super Soaker Could Probably Kill You

Gear
Screenshot via YouTube

You can make a squirt gun out of almost any piece of random junk lying around your house, but Mark Rober, a former NASA engineer who worked on the Curiosity Rover, takes his tinkering to a whole other level.


Do you remember hearing about the most powerful Nerf Gun last summer? That was his. This year though, he added the water works to create the world’s largest Super Soaker. The Guinness World-Record setting firearm is a whopping seven feet long and blasts water at 272 miles per hour.

After consulting with Lonnie Johnson, engineer of the original Super Soaker, Rober and Bob Clagett from the YouTube channel “I Like To Make Stuff” spent six months constructing the behemoth water cannon, which is so powerful it can shatter glass, blow up a soda can, and split a watermelon in half.

The water gun is pressurized at 2,400 pounds per square inch, which, according to Rober is “eight times the pressure of a fire truck hose.”

In hindsight, he added, “[It’s] probably overkill.”

Rober was also kind enough to throw in a Dropbox link with all the instructions for you to build you own weapon of watery destruction. Rober says he used his on his friends and family, but perhaps it would be better suited for the remaining detainees in Gitmo?

**Task & Purpose does not condone the use of waterboarding.**

WATCH NEXT: 

Photo: Twitter

For an organization that is constantly shining a light on things that would rather be kept out of the public eye, the moderators of U.S. Army WTF! Moments have done a remarkably impressive job at staying anonymous.

That is, until Monday.

Read More Show Less

For U.S. service members who have fought alongside the Kurds, President Donald Trump's decision to approve repositioning U.S. forces in Syria ahead of Turkey's invasion is a naked betrayal of valued allies.

"I am ashamed for the first time in my career," one unnamed special operator told Fox News Jennifer Griffin.

In a Twitter thread that went viral, Griffin wrote the soldier told her the Kurds were continuing to support the United States by guarding tens of thousands of ISIS prisoners even though Turkey had nullified an arrangement under which U.S. and Turkish troops were conducting joint patrols in northeastern Syria to allow the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, to withdraw.

"The Kurds are sticking by us," the soldier told Griffin. "No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us."

Read More Show Less

Defense Secretary Mark Esper has confirmed that a nightmare scenario has come to pass: Captured ISIS fighters are escaping as a result of Turkey's invasion of Kurdish-held northeast Syria.

Turkey's incursion has led to "the release of many dangerous ISIS detainees," Esper said in a statement on Monday.

Read More Show Less
ABC News anchor Tom Llamas just before his network airs grossly inaccurate footage

Video footage of a purported "bombing of Kurd civilians" by Turkish military forces shown on ABC News appeared to be a nighttime firing of tracer rounds at a Kentucky gun range.

Read More Show Less

The U.S. military's seemingly never-ending mission supporting civil authorities along the southwestern border will last at least another year.

On Sept. 3, Defense Secretary Mark Esper approved a request from the Department of Homeland Security to provide a total of up to 5,500 troops along the border until Sept. 30, 2020, Lt. Gen. Laura Richardson, commander of U.S. Army North, said on Monday.

Read More Show Less