National Guardsman Jailed After Making ‘Terroristic Threats’ Against VP Pence

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Associated Press photo by Fred Vuich

A National Guard soldier has been arrested after reportedly making death threats against Vice President Mike Pence, according to the Associated Press.


The soldier, 22-year-old William Robert Dunbar, was charged on Sept. 9 with disorderly conduct and making terroristic threats prior to Pence’s visit to Pennsylvania for the Sept. 11 observance of the United Airlines Flight 93 crash.

Dunbar allegedly stated that “If someone pays me enough money, I will kill the vice president,” and witnesses said they contacted their commanding officers after Dunbar made the threatening statement twice, according to the Associated Press. The threats came while Dunbar was on duty at the Army National Guard Training Center in Richland Township, Pennsylvania, notes WeAreCentralPA.com.

According the Pennsylvania General Assembly website, the “terroristic threats,” Dunbar is charged with, are defined as communicating an intent to “commit any crime of violence with the intent to terrorize another; cause evacuation of a building, place of assembly or facility of public transportation; or otherwise cause serious public inconvenience, or cause terror or serious public inconvenience with reckless disregard of the risk of causing such terror or inconvenience.”

Related: Soldiers And Airman Booted From VP Pence’s Detail After Bringing Women Back To Panama Hotel »

In addition to any other sentences imposed for making “terroristic threats,” an individual convicted of the charge is required to pay restitution for the cost of any subsequent evacuation, and to cover any costs related to transportation, police, fire, or emergency response.

Pence addressed 1,000 attendees in Shanksville, Pennsylvania on the 16th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, according to the Associated Press. There, the vice president honored the 33 passengers and seven crewmembers who died on the Flight 93 cra from Newark, New Jersey, to San Francisco, which crashed near Shanksville when the passengers and crew overcame the hijackers.

"Without regard to personal safety, they rushed forward to save lives," Pence said during the memorial ceremony. "I will always believe that I and many others in our nation's capital were able to go home that day and hug our families because of the courage and sacrifice of the heroes of Flight 93."

Police told the Associated Press that Dunbar was taken to Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center for “evaluation.” He was then transferred before to the Cambria County Prison after failing to post 10% of his $250,000 bail.

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