The Navy deployed an aircraft carrier armed with Louisville Slugger baseball bats to the Arctic

Mandatory Fun

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

It's not often sailors get permission to take a baseball bat to a multimillion-dollar aircraft carrier.

But when the Navy's aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman sailed into the Arctic Circle for the first time in nearly three decades, its crew was ordered to do just that.


The Truman sailed into the Arctic Circle on Oct. 19 to conduct operations in the Norwegian Sea. After years of operations in warmer climates, leaders had to think carefully about the gear they'd need to survive operations in the frigid conditions.

"We had to open a lot of old books to remind ourselves how to do operations up there," Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson said this week during the McAleese Defense Programs Conference, an annual program in Washington, D.C.

In one of those books was a tip for the Truman's crew from a savvy sailor who knew what it would take to combat ice buildup on the flattop.

"[It said] 'Hey, when you get out to do this, when you head on out, don't forget to bring a bunch of baseball bats,'" Richardson said. "'There's nothing like bashing ice off struts and masts and bulkheads like a baseball bat, so bring a bunch of Louisville Sluggers.'

"And we did," the CNO said.

Operating in those conditions is likely to become more common. Rising temperatures are melting ice caps and opening sea lanes that weren't previously passable, Richardson said.

But it takes a different set of skill sets than today's generation is used to, he added.

"Getting proficiency in doing flight operations in heavy seas, in cold seas -- just operating on deck in that type of environment is a much different stress than doing flight operations on a deck that's 120 degrees in the Middle East," Richardson said. "You've got to recapture all these skills in heavy seas."

The Truman's push into the Arctic was part of an unpredictable deployment model it followed last year. For years, the Navy got good at taking troops and gear to the Middle East, hanging out there for as long as possible, and then coming home.

Now, Richardson said, there's a different set of criteria.

"We're going to be moving these maneuver elements much more flexibly," he said. "Perhaps unpredictably around the globe, so we're not going to be back and forth, back and forth."

The Truman sailed through the Strait of Gibraltar after leaving Norfolk, Virginia, last spring. The carrier stopped in the Eastern Mediterranean, where it carried out combat missions against the Islamic State group and trained with NATO allies.

About three months later, the carrier was back in its homeport before heading back out -- during which it made the stop in the Arctic Circle. The carrier strike group returned home in December.

This article originally appeared on Military.com

More articles from Military.com:

SEE ALSO: The Navy Wants To Ditch An Aircraft Carrier To Buy New Weapons For A Next-level Fight With China

WATCH NEXT: The USS Abraham Lincoln Conducts A High-Speed Turn At Sea

(U.S. Army photo)
(U.S. Air Force)

Two airmen were administratively punished for drinking at the missile launch control center for 150 nuclear LGM-30G Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming, the Air Force confirmed to Task & Purpose on Friday.

Read More Show Less

Two F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters recently flew a mission in the Middle East in "beast mode," meaning they were loaded up with as much firepower as they could carry.

The F-35s with the 4th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron took off from Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates to execute a mission in support of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, Air Forces Central Command revealed. The fifth-generation fighters sacrificed their high-end stealth to fly with a full loadout of weaponry on their wings.

Read More Show Less
(DoD photos)

The U.S. Senate closed out the week before Memorial Day by confirming Gen. James McConville as the Army's new chief of staff and Adm. Bill Moran as the Navy's new chief of naval operations.

McConville, previously vice chief of staff of the Army, was confirmed on Thursday along with his successor, Lt Gen. Joseph Marin. Moran, currently vice chief of naval operations, was confirmed Friday along with his successor, Vice Adm. Robert Burke.

Read More Show Less

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is prohibiting service members who work there from being in the area of a Ku Klux Klan rally scheduled for Saturday in downtown Dayton, Ohio.

Read More Show Less
(Associated Press/Elise Amendola)

The Pentagon is producing precisely diddly-squat in terms of proof that Iran is behind recent attacks in the Middle East, requiring more U.S. troops be sent to the region.

Adm. Michael Gilday, director of the Joint Staff, said on Friday that the U.S. military is extending the deployment of about 600 troops with four Patriot missile batteries already in the region and sending close to 1,000 other service members to the Middle East in response to an Iranian "campaign" against U.S. forces.

Read More Show Less