Navy Football Is About To Get Its Own TV Series

Entertainment

U.S. Naval Academy football fans everywhere can rejoice this season, because the Midshipmen won’t just play on Saturdays, they’ll also be featured on Showtime Sports’ third iteration of A Season With — a series that chronicles a season behind the scenes with a sports team.


The network announced Aug. 15 that A Season with Navy Football will premiere on Sept. 5 and feature 30-minute episodes on at 10 p.m. on Tuesdays.

"This is a tremendous opportunity through the extraordinary exposure of Showtime to share the character and impact of Navy football to the nation," Chet Gladchuk, Navy athletics director, said in a release. "These stories have never before been told to the public and they will highlight the dedication and commitment reflected by our coaches and midshipmen who represent this program.”

The show’s directors, who followed the Notre Dame FIghting Irish and Florida State Seminoles in their first two seasons, chose Navy because they wanted to feature an atypical college athlete experience. Production is currently ongoing in Annapolis, Maryland.

“It’s an honor and privilege to be welcomed by the United States Naval Academy and given extensive access to its accomplished football program and prestigious institution,” Stephen Espinoza, executive vice president and general manager with SHOWTIME Sports, said in the Navy’s release.

Personally, we’re looking forward to the premiere, along with the debut of the Midshipmen’s sleek new Under Armour uniforms.

This is Navy’s 137th football season. And up until a stunning upset in 2016, they had gone undefeated against their Army rivals at West Point for 14 years. Now with the added pressure of being documented by a high-profile premium channel, the Midshipmen will have to give this season everything they’ve got to reclaim their dominance over the Black Knights.

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