Navy guided missile cruiser, resupply vessel involved in minor wreck off of Florida

Bullet Points
The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) is underway conducting at-sea training with the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Justin Wolpert)

Two Norfolk-based Navy ships were damaged Tuesday afternoon when they collided during a replenishment-at-sea, U.S. Fleet Forces Command said.


  • No one was injured. The Norfolk-based guided missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf and USNS Robert E. Peary, a dry cargo ship operated by Military Sealift Command, were operating with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group off the southeastern coast when their sterns touched during the replenishment around 4 p.m.
  • The ships were able to operate safely and will be assessed for damage in port. The incident was first reported by the U.S. Naval Institute News, which described damage to the cargo ship as an 8-inch gap above the waterline. The Leyte Gulf had minor damage to flight-deck netting.
  • The Lincoln strike group has been operating in advance of a deployment that will shift the aircraft carrier's homeport from Norfolk to San Diego, part of a three-carrier swap that will send thousands of sailors, spouses, kids, pets and cars across the country.

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©2019 The Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Va.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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