Former Navy Pilot Describes Bizarre Encounter With Aircraft With 'No Plumes, Wings, Or Rotors' That Outran His Fighter Jet

news
n F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 prepares to land on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).
Photo via DoD

Commander David Fravor's colleagues made fun of him after learning he encountered what appeared to be a UFO during a standard training mission off the coast of San Diego in 2004.


Fravor was in his F/A-18F fighter jet when a radio operator asked him to investigate a mysterious, white floating object hovering over the sea, he told the New York Times. He made a beeline for the 40-foot, oval-shaped object. But as he approached, it changed course and disappeared.

"It accelerated like nothing I've ever seen," he told the New York Times, adding that he was "pretty weirded out," and that although he had no idea what he saw, all he could tell was that "it had no plumes, wings or rotors and outran our F-18s."

Fravor's bizarre account comes on the heels of another New York Times report on a secret government program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, which was reportedly established in 2007 at the request of then Nevada Sen. Harry Reid. From 2008 through 2011, the Pentagon spent $22 million on the program to research and investigate UFOs and the potential threats posed by them, according to the New York Times.

Those who urge the government to expend more time and money on investigating UFOs point to Fravor's encounter as an example of the type of incidents that are worth looking into.

UFO enthusiasts believe the government is covering up the truth of the existence of extraterrestrial life. Ever since the famous Roswell incident of 1947, in which a  flying disc-shaped object crashed at a ranch in New Mexico, they've been clamoring for the government to release all of its classified UFO documents.

"It occurred to me that it wasn't a scientific problem, but a political one," Stephen Bassett, the first and only person to register as a UFO lobbyist on Capitol Hill, told The Washington Post in 2015.

Once the truth is revealed, he added, you will see "more transparency, more communication among countries, an age of reform."

On Saturday, Bassett excitedly tweeted about the news of the Pentagon's secret program, calling it "significant."

&ref;_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.businessinsider.com%2Fformer-navy-pilot-said-he-saw-ufo-and-it-weirded-him-out-2017-12

More from Business Insider:

WATCH NEXT:

The U.S. military's withdrawal from northeast Syria is looking more like Dunkirk every day.

On Wednesday, the U.S. military had to call in an airstrike on one of its own ammunition dumps in northern Syria because the cargo trucks required to safely remove the ammo are needed elsewhere to support the withdrawal, Task & Purpose has learned.

Read More Show Less

Retired two-star Navy. Adm. Joe Sestak is the highest ranking — and perhaps, least known — veteran who is trying to clinch the Democratic nomination for president in 2020.

Sestak has decades of military experience, but he is not getting nearly as much media attention as fellow veterans Pete Buttigieg and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii). Another veteran, Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) has dropped out of the race.

Read More Show Less

After preliminary fitness test scores leaked in September, many have voiced concerns about how women would fare in the new Army Combat Fitness Test.

The scores — which accounted for 11 of the 63 battalions that the ACFT was tested on last year — showed an overall failure rate of 84% for women, and a 70% pass rate for men.

But Army leaders aren't concerned about this in the slightest.

Read More Show Less
This photo taken on Oct. 7, 2018, shows a billboard that reads "The State Central Navy Testing Range" near residential buildings in the village of Nyonoksa, northwestern Russia. The Aug. 8, 2019, explosion of a rocket engine at the Russian navy's testing range just outside Nyonoksa led to a brief spike in radiation levels and raised new questions about prospective Russian weapons. (AP Photo/Sergei Yakovlev)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Three U.S. diplomats have been removed from a train and briefly questioned by Russian authorities in the sensitive Arctic shipyard city of Severodvinsk, near the site of a mysterious explosion in August that killed five nuclear workers.

Russia's Interfax news agency reported on October 16 that the diplomats were taken off the train that runs between Severodvinsk and Nyonoksa around 6 p.m. on October 14.

Read More Show Less

The U.S. Coast Guard had ordered the owner of an illegal 45-foot charter boat, named "Sea You Twerk," to stop operating.

He didn't, the Coast Guard said.

Now, Dallas Lad, 38, will serve 30 days in federal prison, a judge ruled Friday. When he is released, Ladd of Miami Beach, who pleaded guilty, will not be able to own or go on a boat for three years.

Read More Show Less