Navy Recruiting District Michigan Commander Relieved

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Cmdr. John W. House.

U.S. Navy photo

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The head of Navy Recruiting District Michigan has been relieved of his duties, a Navy spokeswoman said Wednesday.


Cmdr. John W. House was relieved Tuesday by Navy Recruiting Region East Commodore Capt. James D. Bahr for "loss of confidence," said Lt. Cmdr. Jessica McNulty, a Navy Recruiting Command spokeswoman.

The firing comes as a result of a Navy Recruiting Command Office of Inspector General investigation into allegations "relating to Commander House," McNulty said. She did not elaborate on the allegations and added that "appropriate accountability actions will be taken."

House has been temporarily assigned to Navy Operational Support Center Detroit.

Cmdr. David Pavlik, NRD Michigan's executive officer, has assumed command duties at the district.

House has served in the Navy for more than 30 years. He enlisted in 1988 as a submarine sonar technician, and later was selected for the Seaman to Admiral program, earning his commission in 1996 following Officer Candidates School.

As a surface warfare officer, House served as a damage control assistant on the guided-missile destroyer Russell; a weapons control and combat systems officer on the guided-missile cruiser Mobile Bay; a sea strike officer for Carrier Strike Group 11; and executive officer of the guided-missile frigate Hawes and amphibious transport dock San Diego.

His decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with two gold stars, and Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal with three gold stars.

This article originally appeared on Military.com

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