New Pentagon Policy: Deployable In 12 Months Or You're Out

news
The sun sets behind a C-17 Globemaster III as Soldiers wait in line to board the aircraft taking them back to the United States Nov. 17, 2008, at Joint Base Balad, Iraq. C-17s can carry payloads up to 169,000 pounds and can land on small airfields.
U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Erik Gudmundson

Facing enormous demand around the globe and a slump in military retention, the Pentagon on Wednesday introduced a new policy that will require servicemembers to be deployable within 12 months or be forced out of the armed services.


“On any given day, about 13 to 14 percent of force is medically unable to deploy — that comes out to be around 286,000 servicemembers," Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Robert Wilkie told a Senate panel Wednesday.

“The situation we face today is really unlike anything we have faced — certainly in the post-World War II era,” Wilkie said. “We have to ensure, given the climate this country faces, that everyone who signs up can be deployed anywhere in the world.”

Testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on personnel and family readiness, Wilkie described the policy as an effort to bolster military retention.

He likened the problem to Amazon having 14 percent of its staff out sick on Christmas week. If that were to happen, Amazon would not be “the largest company in the world,” he said.

In July, alarmed at the numbers of servicemembers who were unable to deploy for medical reasons, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis tasked Wilkie with finding the problems and resolving them. It turned out, a large number were unable to deploy for the simple reason of not having gone to the dentist, Wilkie said. That falls on the shoulders of junior officers who are responsible for ensuring their servicemembers are ready to deploy, Wilkie said.

Another issue was recruiting. During years of slow recruiting, the military offered “too many” medical waivers, Wilkie said. Those medical problems follow the servicemembers through their service careers.

Wilkie said the military also needs to get its fitness and training programs up to standards to ensure its forces are healthy.

The new policy will give servicemembers 12 months to be ready for deployment from the time they are called on to deploy or they will be forced out, Wilkie said. There will be exceptions, he said, including pregnancy, postpartem and wounded servicemembers.

Exceptions aside, the policy will be “an across the board standard that will apply to everyone,” he said, emphasizing the enormity of 286,000 nondeployable servicemembers.

“It is a staggering number and in this world, where the forces are at a premium and we are struggling to maintain the ranks, we need to get a grip on this,” he said.

———

©2018 the Stars and Stripes. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Photo: Twitter

For an organization that is constantly shining a light on things that would rather be kept out of the public eye, the moderators of U.S. Army WTF! Moments have done a remarkably impressive job at staying anonymous.

That is, until Monday.

Read More Show Less

For U.S. service members who have fought alongside the Kurds, President Donald Trump's decision to approve repositioning U.S. forces in Syria ahead of Turkey's invasion is a naked betrayal of valued allies.

"I am ashamed for the first time in my career," one unnamed special operator told Fox News Jennifer Griffin.

In a Twitter thread that went viral, Griffin wrote the soldier told her the Kurds were continuing to support the United States by guarding tens of thousands of ISIS prisoners even though Turkey had nullified an arrangement under which U.S. and Turkish troops were conducting joint patrols in northeastern Syria to allow the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, to withdraw.

"The Kurds are sticking by us," the soldier told Griffin. "No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us."

Read More Show Less

Defense Secretary Mark Esper has confirmed that a nightmare scenario has come to pass: Captured ISIS fighters are escaping as a result of Turkey's invasion of Kurdish-held northeast Syria.

Turkey's incursion has led to "the release of many dangerous ISIS detainees," Esper said in a statement on Monday.

Read More Show Less
ABC News anchor Tom Llamas just before his network airs grossly inaccurate footage

Video footage of a purported "bombing of Kurd civilians" by Turkish military forces shown on ABC News appeared to be a nighttime firing of tracer rounds at a Kentucky gun range.

Read More Show Less

The U.S. military's seemingly never-ending mission supporting civil authorities along the southwestern border will last at least another year.

On Sept. 3, Defense Secretary Mark Esper approved a request from the Department of Homeland Security to provide a total of up to 5,500 troops along the border until Sept. 30, 2020, Lt. Gen. Laura Richardson, commander of U.S. Army North, said on Monday.

Read More Show Less