The Newest ‘Call of Duty: WWII’ Trailer Just Dropped And It’s Pure Insanity

Entertainment

Have you ever wondered what it might be like to battle alongside the Greatest Generation against Adolf Hitler and the rising tide of Nazi tyranny? Well, you can’t actually do that, Call of Duty: WWII, the franchise's 14th installment, lets you virtually storm Normandy, drop into France with the 101st Airborne, and kill Nazi’s a la Inglorious Basterds ...minus Brad Pitt’s shitty accent.


And while we first got a long, hard look at the intense new gameplay in a June preview, the new trailer Activision released on Aug. 14 shows off the game’s multiplayer beta view in all its bloody, fiery glory.

Activision certainly wants players to think of the game as the digital equivalent of a historic reenactment — sort of. “From the beaches of Normandy to the Hürtgen Forest, experience a dramatic story highlighting some of the most dramatic and iconic moments of World War II as a young soldier who is facing the unforgiving reality of war alongside his brothers in arms,” the official release page says.

The company isn’t wrong. Watching the trailer with headphones in almost makes the gameplay feel like you’ve been transported to Nazi Germany as the rumble of Luftwaffe planes drop bombs on war-torn Berlin. Ordnance drops from low-flying planes, showering debris on soldiers slogging through the ruins of European cities to battle Axis troops on the ground.

Not everything is historically accurate. There is a zombie mode, too: if war isn’t gruesome enough for you, you may as well add an army of undead Nazis.

The decision to release a World War II game marks a return Call of Duty’s roots after nearly a decade of developing games from different eras. The beta version will be available to PlayStation 4 owners on Aug. 25 and XBOX users Sept. 1. Call of Duty: WWII officially hits shelves Nov. 3.

WATCH NEXT:

Screenshot via YouTibe
(U.S. Air Force via Air Force amn/nco/snco)

At least one Air Force base is on the lookout for a sinister new threat: angry men who can't get laid.

Personnel at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland were recently treated to a threat brief regarding an "increase in nationwide activity" by self-described "incels," members of an online subculture of "involuntary celibacy" who adopt an ideology of misogyny, mistrust of women, and violence in response to their failed attempts at romantic relationships.

The brief was first made public via a screenshot posted to the popular Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook page on Tuesday. An Air Force spokesman confirmed the authenticity of the screenshot to Task & Purpose.

"The screenshot was taken from a Joint Base Andrews Intel brief created following basic threat analysis on an increase in nationwide activity by the group," 11th Wing spokesman Aletha Frost told Task & Purpose in an email.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Air Force/MSgt. Brian Kimball)

From Long Beach to Huntington Beach, residents were greeted Saturday, June 15, at precisely 8 a.m. with "The Star-Spangled Banner." Then 12 hours later, the "Retreat" bugle call bellowed throughout Seal Beach and beyond.

At first, people wondered if the booming sound paid tribute to Flag Day, June 14. Seal Beach neighbors bordering Los Alamitos assumed the music was coming from the nearby Joint Forces Training Base.

But then it happened again Sunday. And Monday. Folks took to the Nextdoor social media app seeking an answer to the mystery.

Read More Show Less
(Courtesy photo)

NAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — The main thing to remember about Navy SEAL Chief Craig Miller's testimony on Wednesday is that he didn't seem to remember a lot.

Miller, considered a key witness in the trial of Chief Eddie Gallagher, testified that he saw his former platoon chief stab the wounded ISIS fighter but was unable to recall a number of details surrounding that event. Gallagher is accused of murdering the wounded fighter and separately firing on innocent civilians during a deployment to Mosul, Iraq in 2017. He has pleaded not guilty.

Read More Show Less

NAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — An enlisted Navy SEAL sniper testified on Wednesday that Chief Eddie Gallagher told his platoon prior to their deployment that if they ever captured a wounded fighter, their medics knew "what to do to nurse them to death."

In early morning testimony, former Special Operator 1st Class Dylan Dille told a packed courtroom that he had heard the phrase during unit training before the men of SEAL Team 7 Alpha Platoon deployed to Mosul, Iraq in 2017.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army photo)

A Navy SEAL sentenced to one year in prison for the death of Army Special Forces Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar is under investigation for allegedly flirting with Melgar's widow while using a false name and trying to persuade her that he and another SEAL accused of killing her husband were "really good guys," according to the Washington Post.

Read More Show Less