The Newest ‘Call of Duty: WWII’ Trailer Just Dropped And It’s Pure Insanity

Entertainment
Screenshot via YouTibe

Have you ever wondered what it might be like to battle alongside the Greatest Generation against Adolf Hitler and the rising tide of Nazi tyranny? Well, you can’t actually do that, Call of Duty: WWII, the franchise's 14th installment, lets you virtually storm Normandy, drop into France with the 101st Airborne, and kill Nazi’s a la Inglorious Basterds ...minus Brad Pitt’s shitty accent.


And while we first got a long, hard look at the intense new gameplay in a June preview, the new trailer Activision released on Aug. 14 shows off the game’s multiplayer beta view in all its bloody, fiery glory.

Activision certainly wants players to think of the game as the digital equivalent of a historic reenactment — sort of. “From the beaches of Normandy to the Hürtgen Forest, experience a dramatic story highlighting some of the most dramatic and iconic moments of World War II as a young soldier who is facing the unforgiving reality of war alongside his brothers in arms,” the official release page says.

The company isn’t wrong. Watching the trailer with headphones in almost makes the gameplay feel like you’ve been transported to Nazi Germany as the rumble of Luftwaffe planes drop bombs on war-torn Berlin. Ordnance drops from low-flying planes, showering debris on soldiers slogging through the ruins of European cities to battle Axis troops on the ground.

Not everything is historically accurate. There is a zombie mode, too: if war isn’t gruesome enough for you, you may as well add an army of undead Nazis.

The decision to release a World War II game marks a return Call of Duty’s roots after nearly a decade of developing games from different eras. The beta version will be available to PlayStation 4 owners on Aug. 25 and XBOX users Sept. 1. Call of Duty: WWII officially hits shelves Nov. 3.

WATCH NEXT:

It is impossible to tune out news about the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump now that the hearings have become public. And this means that cable news networks and Congress are happier than pigs in manure: this story will dominate the news for the foreseeable future unless Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt get back together.

But the wall-to-wall coverage of impeachment mania has also created a news desert. To those of you who would rather emigrate to North Korea than watch one more lawmaker grandstand for the cameras, I humbly offer you an oasis of news that has absolutely nothing to do with Washington intrigue.

Read More Show Less

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia will return three captured naval ships to Ukraine on Monday and is moving them to a handover location agreed with Kiev, Crimea's border guard service was cited as saying by Russian news agencies on Sunday.

A Reuters reporter in Crimea, which Russian annexed from Ukraine in 2014, earlier on Sunday saw coastguard boats pulling the three vessels through the Kerch Strait toward the Black Sea where they could potentially be handed over to Ukraine.

Read More Show Less

There's a joke that Joey Jones likes to use when he feels the need to ease the tension in a room or in his own head.

To calm himself down, he uses it to remind himself of the obstacles he's had to overcome. When he faces challenges today — big or small — it brings him back to a time when the stakes were higher.

Jones will feel out a room before using the line. For nearly a decade, Jones, 33, has told his story to thousands of people, given motivational speeches to NFL teams and acted alongside a three-time Academy Award-winning actor.

On Tuesday afternoon, he stood at the front of a classroom at his alma mater, Southeast Whitfield High School in Georgia. The room was crowded with about 30 honor students.

It took about 20 minutes, but Jones started to get more comfortable as the room warmed up to him. A student asked about how he deals with post-traumatic stress disorder.

"I believe in post-traumatic growth," Jones said. "That means you go through tough and difficult situations and on the back end through recovery, you learn strength."

Read More Show Less

It didn't take long for a central theme to emerge at the funeral of U.S. Marine Pfc. Joseph Livermore, an event attended by hundreds of area residents Friday at Union Cemetery in Bakersfield.

It's a theme that stems from a widespread local belief that the men and women who have served in the nation's armed forces are held in particularly high esteem here in the southern valley.

"In Bakersfield and Kern County, we celebrate our veterans like no place else on Earth," Bakersfield Chief of Police Lyle Martin told the gathering of mourners.

Read More Show Less

An Air Force Special Tactics combat controller that "delivered thousands of pounds of munition" during a close-range 2007 firefight in Afghanistan was awarded the Silver Star on Friday.

Read More Show Less