An Assessment Of American Military Power Isn’t Realistic Unless It Compares Our Strength To Others

On Feb. 24, the Heritage Foundation, a D.C.-based conservative think tank, published an index of American military strengths. The assessment, … Continued

An Assessment Of American Military Power Isn’t Realistic Unless It Compares Our Strength To Others

On Feb. 24, the Heritage Foundation, a D.C.-based conservative think tank, published an index of American military strengths. The assessment, which has been criticized by some for shortsightedness, graded all of the military services, as well as America’s nuclear capabilities, on whether or not they were “marginally capable” of waging two regional conflicts at the same time. It seems that the American military has a new benchmark — marginal capability.

However, there’s one problem. The section, “Assessing Threats To U.S. Vital Interests,” makes no mention of U.S. military strength relative to other countries.

“The lack of a solid analysis of relative military power makes the overall well-researched report less compelling, and appears to be a prime example of inside-the-beltway introversion, with the authors more consumed with battling the overblown Pentagon bureaucracy, than with what is happening in the rest of the world,” writes Franz-Stefan Gady in his counterpoint, “How Powerful Is the US Military?”

James Clark

James Clarkis the Deputy Editor of Task & Purpose and a Marine veteran. He oversees daily editorial operations, edits articles, and supports reporters so they can continue to write the impactful stories that matter to our audience. In terms of writing, James provides a mix of pop culture commentary and in-depth analysis of issues facing the military and veterans community. Contact the author here.

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