Sailor Under Investigation For 'Intentional' Fire That Destroyed Drug Test Samples

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On Nov. 30, Maj. Gen. Ray Fox, commanding general II Marine Expeditionary Force, ordered a MEF-wide urinalysis for the nearly 53,000 active-duty Marines and sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. Samples were collected from men and women and shipped for analysis before the end of the day, as a part of the detection phase of the II MEF Counter Drug Campaign to preserve the force and its readiness.

On Nov. 30, Maj. Gen. Ray Fox, commanding general II Marine Expeditionary Force, ordered a MEF-wide urinalysis for the nearly 53,000 active-duty Marines and sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. Samples were collected from men and women and shipped for analysis before the end of the day, as a part of the detection phase of the II MEF Counter Drug Campaign to preserve the force and its readiness.

A Navy sailor who works at Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach, Va. is under investigation for a "suspicious" fire that destroyed up to 900 urinalysis samples and records, The Virginian-Pilot reports.

Investigators say a large metal cage locker that housed the samples was "intentionally" set on fire with gasoline on May 1, the same day the sailor's unit initiated a full drug test for its members, according to an affidavit filed Aug. 15.

Investigators obtained a search warrant for the sailor's cell phone records, according to Associated Press. Here's more from The Pilot:

An investigation revealed that the sailor spent $5.23 for gasoline at a Norfolk 7-Eleven around 4:45 p.m. May 1, and his vehicle was captured on an Oceana gate surveillance camera entering the base at 7:30 p.m., according to court documents. The vehicle left at 8:56 p.m – nine minutes after a fire alarm was received.

The sailor was scheduled to be on leave from 3:30 p.m. that day through May 5, but told a co-worker he forgot something in his locker and returned to get it around 6 p.m. When the urinalysis was announced, the sailor added a day to his leave and did not return to work until May 8.

Witnesses also told NCIS a duty stander was the last person to lock up and leave the workspace that day at 3:30 p.m.

A Naval Criminal Investigative Service spokesman told the AP no one has yet been charged in the case.

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