How To End Veteran Suicide

U.S. Army Soldier with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), pulls security during a battle drill … Continued

How To End Veteran Suicide

U.S. Army Soldier with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), pulls security during a battle drill on Forward Operating Base Lightning, Afghanistan, Oct. 3, 2013. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Justin A. Moeller, 4th Brigade Combat team Public Affairs)With 22 veterans committing suicide a day, more veterans need to become mental health professionals. Through shared experience, combat veterans are uniquely poised to help their peers struggling with post traumatic stress disorder and similar psychological wounds.

“I truly feel the key to providing military members much needed relief from their PTSD and depression symptoms is providing them access to more mental health professionals with combat experience like them,” writes Staff Sgt. Ryan Ramsey, a former combat veteran and Green Beret.

Though medical school may be fiscally daunting, if the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention Act is passed, veterans who pursue a career in mental health at the Department of Veterans Affairs could have their school loans repaid.

James Clark

James Clarkis the Deputy Editor of Task & Purpose and a Marine veteran. He oversees daily editorial operations, edits articles, and supports reporters so they can continue to write the impactful stories that matter to our audience. In terms of writing, James provides a mix of pop culture commentary and in-depth analysis of issues facing the military and veterans community. Contact the author here.

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