The Army’s Medical College Knew About Doctor’s ‘Bizarre’ Methods For Decades

A Reuters' report shows that leadership at the U.S. military’s medical college knew that John Henry Hagmann, a former Army … Continued

The Army’s Medical College Knew About Doctor’s ‘Bizarre’ Methods For Decades

A Reuters' report shows that leadership at the U.S. military’s medical college knew that John Henry Hagmann, a former Army doctor, injected medical students with hypnotic drugs, induced shock by withdrawing blood, and performed rectal exams in class. What’s more is that the college was aware of his unorthodox methods for more than 20 years.

Records reviewed by Reuters show that school officials knew of Hagmann’s teaching methods long before 2013, when the doctor was escorted off the Uniformed Services University in Maryland. The records include the university’s own investigation, which shows that three faculty members sat in on Hagmann’s course in 2012, but failed to alert their superiors to Hagmann’s practices, even after witnessing practices that the school has since banned. A former dean even tried to have Hagmann court-martialed in 1993 over similar allegations.

Hagmann has denied any wrongdoing and is expected to appeal the revocation of his license, which happened last month.

James Clark

James Clarkis the Deputy Editor of Task & Purpose and a Marine veteran. He oversees daily editorial operations, edits articles, and supports reporters so they can continue to write the impactful stories that matter to our audience. In terms of writing, James provides a mix of pop culture commentary and in-depth analysis of issues facing the military and veterans community. Contact the author here.

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