The Army’s Substance-Abuse Program May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

A USA Today investigation, published on Wednesday, Mar. 11, indicates that the Army’s substance-abuse program might be in trouble — … Continued

The Army’s Substance-Abuse Program May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

A USA Today investigation, published on Wednesday, Mar. 11, indicates that the Army’s substance-abuse program might be in trouble — or, shambles, depending on whether or not you’re a glass half empty, or half full kind of person. According to the report, as many as half of the 7,000 soldiers turned away last year after being screened for drug or alcohol problems should have been treated, and half of the Army’s 54 substance-abuse clinics fall below professional standards.

There are also claims that the service hired incompetent or under qualified caregivers — like the unlicensed “counselor who gave a ‘good’ rating to a soldier who hanged himself two hours later, according to an internal Army report provided to USA today.”

James Clark

James Clarkis the Deputy Editor of Task & Purpose and a Marine veteran. He oversees daily editorial operations, edits articles, and supports reporters so they can continue to write the impactful stories that matter to our audience. In terms of writing, James provides a mix of pop culture commentary and in-depth analysis of issues facing the military and veterans community. Contact the author here.

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