Trump's North Korea Summit Is Back On

Bullet Points
President Donald J. Trump, places a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier as part of the 150th annual Department of Defense (DoD) National Memorial Day Observance hosted by the Secretary of Defense at Arlington National Cemetery, May 28, 2018.
DoD Photo / U.S. Army Sgt. James K. McCann.

President Donald Trump announced Friday that his much-hyped summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un was back on for June 12th in Singapore.


  • On Friday, the president met with a North Korean envoy for more than two hours. Afterward, Trump told reporters that the United States would hold off on imposing more sanctions on North Korea unless talks break down.
  • The summit is expected to be a “getting to know you” meeting that will lead to future talks, the president said.  “We're not going to go in and sign something on June 12th and we never were,” Trump told reporters on Friday. “We're going to start a process. And I told them today: ‘Take your time. We can go fast. We can go slowly.’ But I think they'd like to see something happen. And if we can work that out, that will be good. But the process will begin on June 12th in Singapore.”
  • Trump cancelled the proposed summit on May 24 after a North Korean official sharply criticized Vice President Mike Pence.
  • The president indicated that the United States may ease its “maximum pressure” campaign against North Korea. “I don't even want to use the term ‘maximum pressure’ anymore because I don't want to use that term because we're getting along,” he said. “You see the relationship.  We're getting along.”
  • Now that the summit is back on, U.S. Pacific Command deferred media questions to the White House. “The DOD continues to support the White House and State Department as they plan for the summit between President Trump and Kim Jung-un,” said Pentagon spokesman Marine Lt. Col. Christopher Logan.
  • The upcoming summit could include talks on a peace treaty that finally ends the Korean War, the president said. North and South Korea remain in a technical state of war. The conflict ended in an armistice in 1953. “We talked about ending the war,” Trump said. “And you know, this war has been going on – it's got to be the longest war – almost 70 years, right?  And there is a possibility of something like that.  That's more of a signing of a document that it's very important in one way.  Historically, it's very important.  But we'll see.”

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UPDATE: This story was updated on June 1 with President Trump's comments to reporters.

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A letter from Kim, the second Trump received from the North Korean leader last month, was passed to the U.S. president during the third week of August and came ahead of the North's launch of short-range projectiles on Sept. 10, the South's Joongang Ilbo newspaper reported, citing multiple people familiar with the matter.

In the letter, Kim expressed his willingness to meet the U.S. leader for another summit — a stance that echoed Trump's own remarks just days earlier.

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Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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In all, the two bombers fired 19 JASSMs, successfully eliminating their targets. But the moment would ultimately be one of the last — and certainly most publicized — strategic strikes for the aircraft before operations began to wind down for the entire fleet.

A few months after the Syria strike, Air Force Global Strike Command commander Gen. Tim Ray called the bombers back home. Ray had crunched the data, and determined the non-nuclear B-1 was pushing its capabilities limit. Between 2006 and 2016, the B-1 was the sole bomber tasked continuously in the Middle East. The assignment was spread over three Lancer squadrons that spent one year at home, then six month deployed — back and forth for a decade.

The constant deployments broke the B-1 fleet. It's no longer a question of if, but when the Air Force and Congress will send the aircraft to the Boneyard. But Air Force officials are still arguing the B-1 has value to offer, especially since it's all the service really has until newer bombers hit the flight line in the mid-2020s.

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Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Verizon committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace. Verizon is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn More.

Verizon values leadership, motivation, self-discipline, and hard work — all characteristics that veterans bring to the table. Sometimes, however, veterans struggle with the transition back into the civilian workplace. They may need guidance on interview skills and resume writing, for example.

By participating in the Hiring Our Heroes Corporate Fellowship Program and developing internal programs to help veterans find their place, Verizon continues its support of the military community and produces exceptional leaders.

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(DoD photo)

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