Panasonic Looks To Hire Veterans For Manufacturing Roles At Tesla’s State-Of-The-Art ‘Gigafactory’ In Nevada

career
Construction on the Tesla Motors Gigafactory east of Reno, Nev., March 25, 2015.
Photo by David Calvert/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Editor’s Note: The following story highlights veterans initiatives at Panasonic. Committed to filling its ranks with talented members of the military community, Panasonic is a Hirepurpose client. Learn more here.


Panasonic is actively looking to hire veterans to work in the Panasonic battery cell-making operations within Tesla’s newly constructed Gigafactory, located in Sparks, Nevada. The lithium-ion battery cells Panasonic produces in this operation are then integrated by Tesla into high-energy output battery modules to power Tesla model Electric Vehicles.

The term Gigafactory comes from “the factory’s planned annual battery production capacity of 35 gigawatt-hours (GWh),” according to the company’s own website. Panasonic began battery-cell-making operations at the state-of-the-art Tesla facility in January 2017 and production capacity will expand with demand. The mission of the facility is to achieve the “best performance at the lowest production cost” for lithium ion batteries to power electric vehicles and energy products of the future.

To support this growing battery production operation, Panasonic is actively looking for military veterans of all ranks to fill approximately 200 engineering, manufacturing, and facilities positions.

The dynamic manufacturing partnership between the two companies will give qualified veterans the chance to start a rewarding career in a field that is expected to expand and change the future of the automobile industry.

Panasonic has long been a great place to work for military veterans and was featured in Fortune Magazine’s 2016 ranking of 50 companies that are changing the world and doing well by doing good.  The company was specifically cited for its smart and sustainable technologies, including its contributions to smart cities and the electric vehicle revolution. Ideal candidates must have at least a high school diploma, previous leadership experience either in the workplace or military, and at least three-to-five years of manufacturing or production experience. Learn more about Panasonic’s ideas and innovations  at PanasonicMovesUs.com.

Interested candidates should apply here.

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