This Parris Island Marine Sprinted Into Oncoming Traffic To Save A Man's Life

Community
U.S. Marine Corps Brig. Gen Austin E. Renforth, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and Eastern Recruiting Region, applauds Cpl. Miles Hogan during a ceremony at Parris Island, S.C., Aug. 24, 2017.
U.S. Marine Corps photo

After the impact launched him 20 feet through the air, Marine Corps Cpl. Miles Hogan got up, checked himself for broken bones and sprinted back to the man he’d been trying to save.


Moments earlier on that February 2016 night, Hogan — who was returning to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island — had watched through his windshield as the man’s sedan rear-ended a slow-turning minivan and then veered into oncoming traffic.

According to a news release by the Marine Corps, Hogan pulled over and ran to the man’s aid.

U.S. Marine Corps Brig. Gen Austin E. Renforth, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and Eastern Recruiting Region, applauds Cpl. Miles Hogan during a ceremony at Parris Island, S.C., Aug. 24, 2017.U.S. Marine Corps photo

“I opened the door and the man takes his seat belt off, and I grabbed under his arms to help him stand up,” Hogan told a Corps public affairs officer. “As soon as I pull him to me I took one step back and another car had hit us head on.”

That’s when Hogan and the man found themselves flying through the air.

Hogan collected himself and ran back to the man — still in danger as he lay in the road — and dragged him to the shoulder. According to the Corps, Hogan noticed the man’s eyes were dilated and that he was having trouble looking left and right.

“Hogan gave the man a concussion test, and attended the man until paramedics arrived on the scene,” according to the release. “Following the incident Hogan was hospitalized for a bruised kidney and minor lacerations from the broken glass.”

For his life-saving actions — risking his own life to perform them — Hogan, a musician with the Parris Island Marine Band, was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal at ceremony at the depot last Thursday.

Depot commander Brigadier General Austin E. Renforth pinned on the medal as Hogan’s fellow band members and family watched.

U.S. Marine Corps Brig. Gen Austin E. Renforth, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and Eastern Recruiting Region, applauds Cpl. Miles Hogan during a ceremony at Parris Island, S.C., Aug. 24, 2017.U.S. Marine Corps photo

“This was something I was looking forward to,” Renforth said, according to the release. “This is something that gives me great pride and great joy that one of our own decided to put his personal safety at risk to help somebody else, because that is what we do as Marines 24/7.”

The Navy and Marine Corps Medal is “is awarded to any person who distinguishes them self by heroism not involving conflict with the enemy,” according to the Corps. The life-saving action must be performed “at the risk one’s own life.” It is the highest medal for non-combat bravery.

“The whole situation shouldn’t be an uncommon thing,” Hogan said.

“I did it because I would want somebody to do it for me. It’s what you do, especially as a Marine, that’s what our reputation is built on.”

———

©2017 The Island Packet (Hilton Head, S.C.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

(Associated Press photo)

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Defense Secretary Mark Esper expressed confidence on Sunday in the U.S. military justice system's ability to hold troops to account, two days after President Donald Trump pardoned two Army officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan.

Trump also restored the rank of a Navy SEAL platoon commander who was demoted for actions in Iraq.

Asked how he would reassure countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq in the wake of the pardons, Esper said: "We have a very effective military justice system."

"I have great faith in the military justice system," Esper told reporters during a trip to Bangkok, in his first remarks about the issue since Trump issued the pardons.

Read More Show Less

On a military base, a black flag is bad news. That means it's too hot outside to do anything strenuous, so training and missions are put off until conditions improve.

As the climate changes, there could be plenty more black flag days ahead, especially in Florida, a new analysis from the Union of Concerned Scientists found. America's military bases could see an average of an extra month of dangerously hot days by mid-century. In Florida, they could quadruple.

Pentagon data shows heat-related illnesses and injuries are on the rise in every branch of the military. Last year, nearly 2,800 troops suffered heatstroke or heat exhaustion, a roughly 50 percent jump from 2014.

"I think most of us, if we hear there are tens of thousands of cases of heat stress in our troops every year, our minds would go to where they were deployed," said Kristy Dahl, a senior climate scientist at UCS and the lead author of the study. "But more than 90% of the military cases of heatstroke happened right here at home."

Read More Show Less
In this March 12, 2016, file photo, Marines of the U.S., left, and South Korea, wearing blue headbands on their helmets, take positions after landing on a beach during the joint military combined amphibious exercise, called Ssangyong, part of the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle military exercises, in Pohang, South Korea. (Associated Press/Yonhap/Kim Jun-bum)

BANGKOK (Reuters) - The United States and South Korea said on Sunday they will postpone upcoming military drills in an effort to bolster a stalled peace push with North Korea, even as Washington denied the move amounted to another concession to Pyongyang.

The drills, known as the Combined Flying Training Event, would have simulated air combat scenarios and involved an undisclosed number of warplanes from both the United States and South Korea.

Read More Show Less

An opening ceremony will be held Monday on Hawaii island for a military exercise with China that will involve about 100 People's Liberation Army soldiers training alongside U.S. Army counterparts.

This comes after Adm. Phil Davidson, head of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, spoke on Veterans Day at Punchbowl cemetery about the "rules-based international order" that followed U.S. victory in the Pacific in World War II, and China's attempts to usurp it.

Those American standards "are even more important today," Davidson said, "as malicious actors like the Communist Party of China seek to redefine the international order through corruption, malign cyber activities, intellectual property theft, restriction of individual liberties, military coercion and the direct attempts to override other nations' sovereignty."

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Sunday told North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to "act quickly" to reach a deal with the United States, in a tweet weighing in on North Korea's criticism of his political rival former Vice President Joe Biden.

Trump, who has met Kim three times since 2018 over ending the North's missile and nuclear programs, addressed Kim directly, referring to the one-party state's ruler as "Mr. Chairman".

In his tweet, Trump told Kim, "You should act quickly, get the deal done," and hinted at a further meeting, signing off "See you soon!"

Read More Show Less