11 Glorious Photos Of Marines Getting Pepper-Sprayed Right In The Face

Humor

Getting pepper sprayed right in the face is not fun, but I would argue that looking at photos of it happening to Marines doing it in training certainly is.


Marines assigned to the Barracks at 8th & I in Washington, D.C. as guards recently went through a Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray evaluation course, and while it looks like it was absolutely terrible for the Marines involved, the photos are a riot.

I mean, seriously:

US Marine Corps

"The annual OC spray course consists of a series of self-defense tactics and methods of detainment while battling the effects of the spray," the unit said on its official Facebook page.

Training started off as it usually does, with a briefing on what was to come.

You can even see some smiling faces in the crowd:

US Marine Corps

And then, it was game time:

US Marine Corps

As the Barracks noted in its post on Facebook, "OC spray causes inflammation of the eyes and mucous membranes, making it difficult to see, breath, and function in any coordinated manner."

That seemed like an understatement:

US Marine Corps

Getting knocked in the face by OC spray, however, was only the beginning:

US Marine Corps

From there, Marines were required to beat the crap out of a punching bag (while struggling to see it):

US Marine Corps

The non-lethal weapons instructor sure looks liked he was having a blast:

US Marine Corps

They also needed to battle a suspect with a baton:

US Marine Corps

Take him to the ground:

US Marine Corps

And finally, arrest him:

US Marine Corps

But after it was all over, the loving embrace of a garden hose was there to wash away the awfulness:

US Marine Corps

"This test ensures that the Guard Marines are able to function under pressure, even in the most uncomfortable or painful situations," the unit said.

Mission accomplished, and thank you for the photos.

Photo illustration by Paul Szoldra

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