How PTSD Cost Many Vets Their Military Benefits

news

This week on Task & Purpose Radio, the crew is joined by Kristofer Goldsmith, Army vet and assistant director of policy and government relations for Vietnam Veterans of America, to discuss how service members are getting pushed out of the military with less than honorable discharges due to PTSD or traumatic brain injury. Goldsmith was kicked out of the Army in August 2007 with a general discharge, which he is still fighting.


The show also discusses new policy signed on June 1 by Navy Secretary Ray Mabus addressing administrative discharges for service members with mental health issues. Under this policy, the Navy becomes the first of the services to put precedence on diagnosed mental health conditions over misconduct issues when determining the characterization of a Marine or sailor's discharge.

For more information on less than honorable discharges, check out these Task & Purpose articles:

VA Is Denying Benefits To Vets With Bad Paper Discharges At Unprecedented Rates, Report Finds

This Soldier Stood Up To Sexual Harassment. Then She Was Kicked Out Of The Army

These Vets Stormed The Capitol To Fight For Service Members The Pentagon Left Behind

The Mental Health Care Bill For Vets That No One Is Talking About

If you have questions or feedback for Task & Purpose Radio, send it over to editor@taskandpurpose.com.

Download episode 20, “How Veterans Get Denied Their Benefits” on iTunes. Also, subscribe so you never miss an episode.

You can also listen to the podcast on Soundcloud.

A special thanks to Perry & Co. for sponsoring the podcast. If you have a move coming up, check out MilitaryReloHelp.com for more information on making your move a little easier.

Cmdr. Randolph Chestang, reads his orders during a change of command ceremony in which he relieved Cmdr. Mark E. Postill as Commanding Officer of Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 3 held onboard Naval Outlying Landing Field Imperial Beach Feb. 8, 2018. Chestang was relieved of command in February 2019. (U.S. Navy/Nelson Doromal)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The commanding officer of one of the Navy's coastal riverine squadrons has been fired, service officials announced Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Construction crews staged material needed for the Santa Teresa Border Wall Replacement project near the Santa Teresa Port of Entry. (U.S. Customs and Border Patrol/Mani Albrecht)

With a legal fight challenge mounting from state governments over the Trump administration's use of a national emergency to construct at the U.S.-Mexico border, the president has kicked his push for the barrier into high gear.

On Wednesday, President Trump tweeted a time-lapse video of wall construction in New Mexico; the next day, he proclaimed that "THE WALL IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION RIGHT NOW"

But there's a big problem: The footage, which was filmed more than five months ago on Sep. 18, 2018, isn't really new wall construction at all, and certainly not part of the ongoing construction of "the wall" that Trump has been haggling with Congress over.

Read More Show Less
(From left to right) Chris Osman, Chris McKinley, Kent Kroeker, and Talon Burton

A group comprised of former U.S. military veterans and security contractors who were detained in Haiti on weapons charges has been brought back to the United States and arrested upon landing, The Miami-Herald reported.

The men — five Americans, two Serbs, and one Haitian — were stopped at a Port-au-Prince police checkpoint on Sunday while riding in two vehicles without license plates, according to police. When questioned, the heavily-armed men allegedly told police they were on a "government mission" before being taken into custody.

Read More Show Less
Army Sgt. Jeremy Seals died on Oct. 31, 2018, following a protracted battle with stomach cancer. His widow, Cheryl Seals is mounting a lawsuit alleging that military care providers missed her husband's cancer. Task & Purpose photo illustration by Aaron Provost

The widow of a soldier whose stomach cancer was allegedly overlooked by Army doctors for four years is mounting a medical malpractice lawsuit against the military, but due to a decades-old legal rule known as the Feres Doctrine, her case will likely be dismissed before it ever goes to trial.

Read More Show Less
The first grenade core was accidentally discovered on Nov. 28, 2018, by Virginia Department of Historic Resources staff examining relics recovered from the Betsy, a British ship scuttled during the last major battle of the Revolutionary War. The grenade's iron jacket had dissolved, but its core of black powder remained potent. Within a month or so, more than two dozen were found. (Virginia Department of Historic Resources via The Virginian-Pilot)

In an uh-oh episode of historic proportions, hand grenades from the last major battle of the Revolutionary War recently and repeatedly scrambled bomb squads in Virginia's capital city.

Wait – they had hand grenades in the Revolutionary War? Indeed. Hollow iron balls, filled with black powder, outfitted with a fuse, then lit and thrown.

And more than two dozen have been sitting in cardboard boxes at the Department of Historic Resources, undetected for 30 years.

Read More Show Less