The most realistic toy about Army life ever made is this set with a soldier bored as hell in the barracks

Mandatory Fun
Click N' Play

If you've ever caught yourself wondering aloud (or more than likely, bitching to your friend, partner, or your spouse who absolutely does not care) about how military games and toys aren't realistic, then you're in luck!

Click N'Play is here to ensure 100% accuracy for those with a military action figure fetish thanks in large part to its "Military Camp Bunk House Life" action figure, which Miranda Summers Lowe surfaced on Twitter earlier this month.


According to a (very) detailed description of the product, Click N' Play's "military action packed pretend play set" is made of "super strong, superior quality BPA free plastic material" with "authentic" and "highly detailed design with uniforms & accessories."

Most importantly, the 12-inch tall figurine is pose-able and has 30 "articulated joint points" so you can act out all your barracks life fantasies! Hooah!

Click N' Play

For just $49.99 on Amazon, you can play enlisted life in the barracks! Live out your wildest dreams of getting swole in the barracks; learning guitar in the barracks; wearing flip flops in the barracks; and staring off into the distance with sad, dead eyes ... in the barracks!

Click N' Play

So, if you're looking to recreate a weekly field day inspection — because who doesn't look back on those fondly — the set comes with a bunk bed, a locker, a closet, backpack, a guitar, weights, clothes, and hangars (don't forget to keep them two action-figure finger-widths apart), and plenty of other items you're sure to lose and have to pay for out of pocket.

With so many essentials, the possibilities are endless! Set up your Joe for an early-morning run; a trip to the head to wash his nasty body and shave off that out of regs face scruff; or get him in the uniform of the day and haze the ever-loving shit out of that idiot boot for misplacing his gear!

Click N' Play

The only way this figure could be more realistic is if Click N' Play put out an expansion pack with porn magazines, a log of Copenhagen long cut, and a dozen water bottles — two of which would be filled with urine, and a third half-full of dip spit.


Click N' Play

If barracks life isn't what you're looking for, then how about manning a radio while you stand an eight hour shift on post in a flimsy guard tower?


Click N' Play

Click N' Play's Military Lookout Watch Tower comes jam-packed with gear, from ammo cans, a radio, a Mk19 that's totally not going to jam on you, and an oil barrel. (If you're wondering where the wagbags are, see "ammo can.")

DISCLAIMER: CAR/CIB/CAB not included with purchase of Click N' Play's military toys.

SEE ALSO: The Lego SR-71: Because Being A Grown Up Is For Suckers And Spy Planes Are Awesome

WATCH NEXT: Jack Mandaville's Guide To Vetsplaining

President Dwight D. Eisenhower poses with Hospital Corpsman Third Class William R. Charette, U.S. Navy, honored for his actions in Korea on 17 March 1953. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command)

A Medal of Honor recipient from Michigan will have a guided-missile destroyer named after him, the United States Navy announced on Monday.

Read More Show Less
President Donald Trump has ramped up airstrikes against al-Shabab in Somalia. (Associated Press/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

The U.S. military could be guilty of war crimes in Somalia, according to a new report that challenges what the government says about civilian casualties from its bombing campaign against al-Shabab, an al-Qaida affiliate, in the African nation.

The investigation, conducted by Amnesty International, found that US airstrikes from both drones and manned aircraft killed at least 14 civilians and injured seven more people in just five of more than 100 strikes in the past two years.

"The attacks appear to have violated international humanitarian law, and some may amount to war crimes," the Amnesty report said.

Read More Show Less
Georgia Army National Guard Soldiers board an aircraft to begin the first leg of their deployment in support of Operation Freedom's Sentinel. (Georgia National Guard/Maj. William Carraway)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A new bill would give troops with infertility related to their military service greater access to advanced reproductive treatments, including up to three completed cycles of in vitro fertilization, or IVF, and cryopreservation of eggs and sperm for those heading to a combat zone.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Osterman, the commanding general of I Marine Expeditionary Force, speaks to Marines with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) during a visit aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). Marines and Sailors with the 11th MEU are conducting routine operations as part of the Boxer Amphibious Ready Group in the eastern Pacific Ocean. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Dalton S. Swanbeck)

The Marine Corps' top general on the west coast is readying his Marines for the next big war against a near peer competitor, and one of his main concerns is figuring out how to alter the mindset of troops that have been fighting insurgencies since 9/11.

"If anything my problem is getting people out of the mindset of [counterterrorism] and making sure they're thinking about near peer adversaries in their training programs," Lt. Gen. Joseph Osterman, commanding general of I Marine Expeditionary Force at Camp Pendleton, California, told Task & Purpose in an interview on Friday.

Read More Show Less
A Ruger AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, center, the same model, though in gray rather than black, used by the shooter in a Texas church massacre two days earlier, sits on display with other rifles on a wall in a gun shop Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Lynnwood, Wash. (Associated Press/Elaine Thompson)

A new bill introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives would require a significant number of state residents own "at least one" AR-15 semi-automatic rifle with the help of a hefty tax break — except it won't ever get off the ground.

Read More Show Less